"Place, with a trace of humanity" Photography/Photo of the Day/Pittsburgh

Pierogies Season- 3 Images

You know these are Mrs. T's from the Giant Eagle freeze case, so now a reason to buy more, shoot and re-post!

Dough filled pockets-
not limited to a single culture.
Let’s count the ways-
ravioli, empanada,
spanikopita in phyllo,
pelmeni, samosa, burekas,
and a pasty. Does strudel count?
I’m sure
you can think of more.

Meatless Fridays in Pittsburgh.   It’s Lent.   Last week in the Post-Gazette there was a list of fish fries all over the city and outskirts but let’s talk Pierogies.   You drive by churches with signs out front  (pierógi, pyrogy or perogi ) or you can buy them at Pierogies Plus or at the Polish Deli in the  Strip.  When I first moved here I had never eaten one. I watched Marianne’s mother, Olga make them from scratch. The boys loved eating them. And in time I started eating them, too. Then I wanted to try to make them.  Marianne told me how to get the right potatoes and  a certain cheese.  I made them once for a Polish Christmas party at someone’s home.  Last fall I saw Arleen make them at Christmas, by hand, parboil them and freeze them for the holiday.(see below)   The whole concept of noodle/pasta dough filled with potatoes did not appeal to me but I was uninitiated.  They can be filled with sauerkraut and other fillings but potato and cheese are the most popular.   I am not sure how many I could eat in a sitting but the butter and onions really satisfy that urge for hearty meals with fat.  One time I shipped a couple of dozen to Florida when the family  lived there.  Something my mother never cooked when I was growing up.  At the baseball games they have Pierogi Races.  No kidding.  See below.

Arleen Makes Pierogies for Christmas

Pierogies Race at PNC Park during the baseball game. (Well, during a break!)

12 responses

  1. My college roommate was from Moosic, PA (near Scranton) and she introduced me to pierogies. Yum! Love all of the pics, especially the pierogie race!

    March 29, 2011 at 12:13 am

  2. Toni

    Mike’s mother made good home made pierogies. Anything in butter and onion is good – I agree. She also made potato dumplings that were boiled, then put in butter and onions. Just saw a recipe for that in the P.G. I love Mrs. T ‘s! My mom made home made ravioli. It was always one of my favorites! Hers was a meat filling, though. Not good for meatless Fridays! Love the photos, too!!

    March 29, 2011 at 12:30 am

  3. Laura

    I love pierogies. They are comfort food to me. I saw a recipe for pierogie casserole that I may make.

    March 29, 2011 at 7:19 am

  4. Sue Reinfeld

    Hey – how about Hamantaschen.

    March 29, 2011 at 8:21 am

  5. connie

    Just returned from our trip to Holiday, Fl near Tarpon Springs. My sister bought multiple varieties of frozen batches of pierogias from the Polish deli in Duenedin and I bought 2 dozen for our house: cherry and strawberry!! Do you think that qualifies as a dessert? While other tourists were icing down their coolers of fresh fish we were working on our Polish delicacies.

    March 29, 2011 at 10:01 am

  6. Hootie

    My mum has some lekvar (prune) pirohis in her freezer that our church made. Must remind her we need to eat them.

    March 29, 2011 at 12:47 pm

    • joyce

      You just brought back a vivid memory from my youth in Pittsburgh!!

      March 29, 2011 at 9:49 pm

  7. erica

    I’m ready to eat those pierogies!!! What is the origin of that word??? What does it mean in …Polish????? potatoes? pancakes? strudel?? specialite de la maison??? :-)

    March 29, 2011 at 2:02 pm

  8. joyce

    When I was a little girl many Fridays during Lent, I went with my mom to a Ukranian church in McKees Rocks to get perogies fresh made by the church ladies. Holding a bowl we’d brought from home to recieve the perogies, we would stand in line with everyone else. When it was our turn we’d go into the kitchen and the ladies would dip into their huge steaming pots and will our bowl with the pastas. Their was always a variety to chose from but mom always got my dad’s favorite, lechveour in Czech which means prune. You didn’t need to cook them in onions; just heat them up. I just loved them!

    March 29, 2011 at 9:47 pm

  9. Looks like a lot of fun.

    March 31, 2011 at 11:21 pm

  10. Amy

    My mom told me my grandmother used to make the prune ones for christmas eve dinner. i like the sauerkraut ones the best! mrs t.s are ok, but homemade are the way to go!!

    April 2, 2011 at 12:42 pm

  11. Pingback: Stuffed Pierogie Doll ? « Blog Archive « Keep or Pitch?

Thanks for visiting the blog today. Comments are always nice to receive but just looking is great, too.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,945 other followers