Stained Glass Exhibition Panel at the Heinz History Center

Photographed March 27, 2019 at the Glass Exhibit in Heinz History Center  Pittsburgh PA


The Pittsburgh Stained Glass Studio, mentioned in the exhibit panel at the History Center, was established in 1909

 

“As the craftsman selects the pieces of colored glass and puts them together in various combinations, he becomes more and more fascinated by the infinite variety of effects to be obtained, and to have a profound love and respect for the material that makes this possible.”

–Howard G. Wilbert 1891-1966

from the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation Website

Not a Single Like Clicked on 20 Dec 2009

What Steve Put on the Mantel

A blog post from December 2009

Not a single “like” clicked when first posted 20 December 2009. A few comments but zero likes. It’s one of my favorites.

Thought I’d repost today.

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What Steve Put on the Mantel

Deborah McLaren’s still life is one I purchased at the PERSAD  Celebrate Life Celebrate Art auction held at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh last May (2009).  The other day I sat at the table, looked up and saw Steve’s additions to the decor.  He’s been purchasing RITZ crackers frequently since I bought the painting- subliminal influence?  I wrote to the artist for her permission to post the image of her painting along with his props. Steve’s fun additions- the unexpected sight of them in front of the still life-  I laughed out loud!  

Please Don’t Touch the Magnificent Costumes (All Made of Paper)

The title of today’s post comes from a conversation I had with one of the guards in the gallery.  He has seen two women lie down on the museum floor to look up the dresses ( he thought they had fainted), two men blow on the hanging costumes to get them to move (saliva included) and a 5 or 6 year old ran into the Queen Elizabeth gown the other day.  Today I saw a woman reach to touch the gossamer lace on a collar.  It’s hard to fathom that the gorgeous costumes/sculptures are made entirely of paper but they are.   

Today at the Frick Art Museum we viewed the exhibition of Isabelle de Borchgrave : Fashioning Art from Paper

My sister Mary reads about the Isabelle de Borchgrave paper sculpture commissioned by the Frick after the Peter Paul Rubens’ Portrait of Princess of Condé, Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency (1594-1650) 




You can touch the paper on this table in the rotunda.

Reflection at CMOA Last Day of 2018

Mary and I went to the Carnegie Museum of Art yesterday, the last day of 2018.

Here we are reflected in artist Dan Grahams Heart Pavilion sculpture.

Our weight appears to fluctuate depending on the curve of the mirror. Our legs reminiscent of Giacometti figures in the last shot. Even with all our holiday eating!

We’ve had a nice time together over the Christmas vacation.

Not a Worry Stone

But a smooth meditation Spalted Maple (piece of highly polished wood) Rubbing it is soothing. I didn’t know the word spalted before today

Created by artisan David Manos- pictured below – who makes gorgeous hardwood buttons and shawl pins, too….you can see his wife Madelyn, peeking! The Wood Rasp Shop at the Indie Knit & Spin Marketplace at the Ace Hotel today.

A Bodhi Wind Original

Here is my friend Vincie in my living room, holding a Bodhi Wind original portrait painted in 1965,  She had just picked it up from the framer’s where Jennifer Panza had helped her select the frame and matting. Vincie brought it in and we unwrapped it so I could admire the framed portrait.  I’d gone with her to help get it framed, weeks ago.

It’s a really good story.

Five years ago last April, I posted about the Extraordinary Art of Bodhi Wind  

In that post I wrote about my friend Steve reading an article in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette by Joe Smydo about what to do with the artwork of an artist who had passed away. When he read the article, he kept asking me if my friend Vincie knew Bodhi Wind since he’d graduated from her alma mater, Perry High School.  After a couple of weeks of him asking if I had checked with Vincie if she knew Bodhi Wind,  I finally remembered to ask her.  “Vincie, Steve has been on my case to ask you if you knew a Bodhi Wind who graduated from Perry High School who was an actor in LA”.

Steve had mentioned the murals Bodhi Wind painted for the Robert Altman film 3 Women  No, she didn’t know him.

(Here is a NYTimes article about The Man Who Painted Robert Altman’s 3 Women by Jennifer Dunning. )

So a few days later the three of us are in the car and it comes up again.

Steve is determined.  Asks Vincie himself.  Turns out I messed up by asking about an actor when I should have inquired about an artist.

When we got home, Steve got on the computer upstairs and called Vincie to come and read the article.  And there was the missing clue.  Bodhi Wind had changed his name.  For more information it said to contact his mother Mrs. Kuklis.  Vincie said, yes, she knew him.  Yes, Vincie and Charles (Chip) Kuklis not only went to High School at Perry together but they were classmates in elementary school.  Steve was insistent that she must have known him and not only did she know him but they were very good friends in elementary school, too.

This past August, Vincie and her friend Maribeth were attending their 50th Perry High School Reunion. Over the reunion weekend, the two of them went to visit Mrs. Kuklis at her home.  Her granddaughter helped show them her Uncle’s artwork but before they looked at the work,  they sat in the living room.  Vincie said that Chip had painted her portrait when they were in high school.  Mrs. Kuklis said “I have it.”

Not only did his mother have the portrait he painted of Vincie in high school,  Mrs. Kuklis had set in out on a special chair for Vincie to see, and Mrs. Kuklis asked Vincie if she would like to have it. Oh my!

What a gift!

Vince wth the original portrait of herself, painted by her childhood friend- Bodhi Wind/Chip Kuklis.  You can see his signature and the date 1965 

Evening Stroll in Reykjavik

Back home in Pittsburgh now but here’s an evening stroll from my hotel to the old city center in Reykjavik last week. Laugavegur was the street. It got dark on my way back. You can see the sea at the end of a couple of the streets. Open candles in windows were inviting

Don’t Mess with a Knitter” tattoo on upper arm- the canvas of the old woman in the window of the closed Art Gallery so no chance to give the artist credit.

Artist at Work: Stephen Hankin

Artist Stephen Hankin, painting at The Frick, Pittsburgh. Although I interrupted his concentration, he graciously allowed me to photograph him at work. Said I could blog him, too.  And here I was wondering what I’d photograph after the People at Work Show was over.  If you live in Pittsburgh or plan to visit and would like to tour his studio (where he has 180 paintings on the walls) you can contact him stephenhankinart(at)gmail(dot)(com)02D3824D-E528-4054-8678-70E2B759C6B906FD85EF-B8D5-4300-B855-6F433C9ECDE1CF4FC959-EC20-468A-9EAD-824089FCA3D110FF63AC-26BE-449C-8597-E75EFE472196The front of his card shows his studio with paintings on the walls.