Morningside August Afternoon

You can drive by 100 times, then suddenly the ordinary scene strikes you. It was the smaller variety of sunflowers that caught my eye. When you’ve been in your house for so long, everything you see looks anew.

The Neighbor’s Hydrangeas

I’ve seen quite a few photos of hydrangeas on other blogs lately. These looked especially lush.

“The name hydrangea comes from the Greek words “hydor” meaning water and “angos” meaning vessel. Which together roughly translate to “water barrel”. This is because of the fact that hydrangeas are notorious for needing lots of water and the cup shaped flowers. The name, Hortensia, is a Latin version of the French word Hortense.” From plant Addicts click to read all about Hydrangeas

Thanks Kelly.

Daylily

They return every year. I learned a Daylily (hemerocallis) is not a lily. You can read it here.

Note: although I edited yesterday’s midday post, you might have missed it. The 250 pound bear seen in my driveway around noon, settled in a yard about three blocks up the street. After s couple of hours, he was tranquilized, captured and relocated. It was on the local news.

First a Fawn, Today a BEAR !

In my driveway.

Not much going on during these three months of quarantine.  At least it seemed like it.
And then my neighbor Joaquin called and said “There’s a bear in your yard!”

What?

“A bear?”  “Now it’s in your driveway. It’s walking by your front door”  I looked out my window and it was sauntering down the path.

I caught a  quick photo.  Yes, it was a bear.

Did I mention I live in the city?

  Post-GazetteJohn Hayes Article

Urban Fawn Spent the Day in the Weeds

My friend reassured me the mother would return, that they leave them in a safe place. I’m hoping that reunion occurred in the night. It was certainly a surprise to find the little fawn looking at me when I went out to get in the car to go to the post office. The fawn spent the day in my backyard, under the apple tree, hidden in some tall weeds. My next door neighbor had helped me plant some heirloom tomato plants and went with me to the very back yard and confirmed it was still lying there. I was concerned it was abandoned but when I called the city help line they said non-threatening wildlife is left to nature. Leave it alone. So I did.