Please Don’t Touch the Magnificent Costumes (All Made of Paper)

The title of today’s post comes from a conversation I had with one of the guards in the gallery.  He has seen two women lie down on the museum floor to look up the dresses ( he thought they had fainted), two men blow on the hanging costumes to get them to move (saliva included) and a 5 or 6 year old ran into the Queen Elizabeth gown the other day.  Today I saw a woman reach to touch the gossamer lace on a collar.  It’s hard to fathom that the gorgeous costumes/sculptures are made entirely of paper but they are.   

Today at the Frick Art Museum we viewed the exhibition of Isabelle de Borchgrave : Fashioning Art from Paper

My sister Mary reads about the Isabelle de Borchgrave paper sculpture commissioned by the Frick after the Peter Paul Rubens’ Portrait of Princess of Condé, Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency (1594-1650) 




You can touch the paper on this table in the rotunda.

Reflection at CMOA Last Day of 2018

Mary and I went to the Carnegie Museum of Art yesterday, the last day of 2018.

Here we are reflected in artist Dan Grahams Heart Pavilion sculpture.

Our weight appears to fluctuate depending on the curve of the mirror. Our legs reminiscent of Giacometti figures in the last shot. Even with all our holiday eating!

We’ve had a nice time together over the Christmas vacation.

Art of the Brick Exhibit is Wow!

Art of the Brick Exhibit is just…Wow! Artist Nathan Sawaya’s Work is amazing. I want to go back and take more time looking and thinking about all his creativity that went into making these artworks. And all from regular LEGO pieces.Thousands of them.

Carnegie Science Center with Michael, Jack and Maura responding to Edvard Munch’s The Scream

One of my favorites (with undulating lights simulating water) was The Swimmer.

Yes, that’s all constructed with LEGO. The piece count is written on each artwork’s label.

It all starts with the single brick

The kids enjoyed building with LEGO at the stations provided on the second floor

a lot of pieces in the Easter Island sculpture Moai Part of the In Pieces Gallery. LEGO objects in large photographs. Umbrella in this one

Fredosaurus Rex on the South Side

Look what I found because I turned right instead of left on 21st Street. Looking for the Brew House Association to drop off a photograph for the Pittsburgh Society of Artists show opening Friday July 6. It’s going to be a weekend of art openings for me.

It’s Fredosaurus Rex.

He used to be in front of WQED on Fifth Avenue. I didn’t get out of the car but I read there was a trolley on his tail.

Fredosaurus by artist Karen Howell holding Henrietta Pussycat and King Friday XIII in front of the Fred Rogers Company Offices

In 2003 dinosaur sculptures were installed all around the city of Pittsburgh for Dinomite Days “Dinosaurs on Parade” sponsored by the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

http://www.neighborhoodarchive.com/images/misc/other/fredosaurus_rex/fred_rex_carnegie.pdf

http://www.neighborhoodarchive.com/misc/fredosaurus_rex/index.html

Photos of other dinosaurs around the city

http://www.pbase.com/ralf/dinodays&page=all

Jet Trails and Kite Tails, Gallery of Lines

LINES. Cheri Lucas Rowlands challenged WordPress bloggers to find lines through their lens. Here is my gallery of lines. Jet trails and kite tails.  Sculpture, railroad tracks, smokestacks and jello layers.

Pittsburgh Skyscraper

Pittsburgh Skyscraper Reflection

Weathered Gallery

Krista Stevens at WordPress challenged bloggers to show the effects of time and the elements in a post – weatheredimg_8034

Okanogan WA

Berlin Germany

 

New York City Playground

 

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Near Roanoke VA

 

Berlin Germany

 

Gainesville FL

snow covered car

Columbus OH

Millvale PA

 

Pittsburgh PA

Penn Avenue Pittsburgh PA

Children’s Museum Pittsburgh 

Home

Lawrenceville PA

Zagreb Croatia

 

 

Near Okanogan WA

Mallott WA

Walking to the Sky: GUEST BLOG

Photographed and written by friend /houseguest Shuey

Pittsburgh, Carnegie U Pole Art

“Walking to the Sky” by Carnegie Mellon University alumnus Jonathan Borofsky

The sculpture was inspired by stories his father used to tell him about a friendly giant who lived in the sky. A father and son in each story would ascend  into the sky to talk to the giant. In this sculpture a father and son along with another onlooker can be seen observing a number of people walking up the 100’ tall pole to the sky.

Borofsky describes this work as “. . . a portrait of all of humanity rising upward from the earth to the heavens above – striving into the future with strength and determination. Ultimately, this sculpture is a symbol for our collective search for wisdom and awakened consciousness.”

Definitely worth seeing.

Shuey

note from Ruth- Remember Shuey’s Barred Owl Photograph? click Barred owl photograph by Shuey