Last Year it was Knuckleheads

A year ago, I saw Knucklehead pumpkins for the first time when I was with friends at the Idylwilde Market in Acton Massachusetts. (Click link to see post)

Fall 2022: I spotted this display at the Bryant Street Market. An image search found American Turks Turban Squash Gourd (Cucurbita Maxima) and you can get ten seeds @$17 to grow your own.

Says they are edible and here’s a recipe link for Turban Squash soup

Turban squash encompasses a group of winter squashes known for their turban-like cap or acorn on the blossom end, and these squashes are predominately used as an ornamental to showcase its bright colors, patterns, and unusual shape. There are many varieties of Turban squash inclu Turk’s Turban, French Turban, Mexican hat, Turk’s Cap, American Turban, and Marina di Chioggia.” From the Specialty Produce website

A Turban Squash resting on top of white squash of some sort I don’t know

Found Cracked Mirror

I didn’t break it.

Just photographed it so no seven years of bad luck, if one were superstitious.

It was right along the building. And there was the green vine creeping up the wall.

I just thought it made an interesting composition

Rocking Horses in the City Redux

You’ve seen the Rocking Horses in the City if you’ve followed me for a few years. I haven’t seen any new rocking horses to add to this repost. I can tell you there’s more discarded furniture than there are rocking horses.

Alley in Arlington Neighborhood

Here’s a Gallery of rocking horses seen around Pittsburgh, from previous blogposts.

East Liberty on Broad Street
Zeke’s Coffee Roaster building is boarded up now
East Liberty Rooftop
Bloomfield Neighborhood
A Window in Garfield Neighborhood

Ruffled Mushrooms on a Rotting Stump

You know I’m fascinated by fungi. No, this is not to eat! but there so many varieties and different ways they grow. They’re found in unexpected places. This crop on a rotting stump.

A Google image search says it might be this type of ruffled mushroom.

Trichaptum abietinum is a species of poroid fungus in the order Hymenochaetales. It is saprophytic, growing from dead conifer wood. The white-gray cap is 1–4 cm wide and usually no more than .5 thick, shelved and fanlike, with brownish and leathery flesh. The spores are white, cylindrical, and smooth. Wikipedia

So this happened after I posted the lone tomato pic

A knitting friend saw my lone cherry tomato harvest post with the accompanying nickel photo . She’d had an abundant harvest. There was a box of raspberries too but I ate them before I thought to take a pic.

Here’s what she brought me and I threw them into olive oil and garlic (thanks David) and turned them into a fresh tomato sauce.

Thank you Joanna.
Freshly grated Parmesan

One More for the Collection

You know I couldn’t resist pulling over, parking my car, getting out and photographing the loveseat/couch.

The rain had stopped. I was on Penn Avenue just past Children’s Hospital and I saw it. It’s not like I’m driving around the city looking for discarded furniture. It’s just there!

Mary always says, take the pic when you see it as later it might be gone. Good advice.