Summer Supper

The recipe from my Clarion PA neighbor, Nell Miller, was called Poor Man Meatballs.

No meat was involved.

Take 3 zucchini and grate or use food processor. Tip bowl to let moisture run off and discard. Get zucchini as dry as you can.

Add an egg

and about 3/4 c Italian Bread crumbs. Add a minced garlic clove or two

Salt and pepper let sit a few minutes. Form in patties.

Sauté in olive oil ‘til brown on both sides. Cast iron skillet works wonderfully. Freshly grated Parmesan is always welcome

A little heavy on the crumbs this batch. Zucchini can be so wet, drain off what liquid you can.

Four Generations of Ancestors

On my mother’s side. 

Four Generations

 My Great Grandmother Mary S. Smith Rowley

My  Great Great Grandmother Charlotte Ann Clark Smith

My Great Aunt May Baker Rowley Potter  b.1883-d.1972

her son Melburn Clark Potter

b.1906-d. 1940

 

My Great Great Grandmother  Charlotte Ann Clark Smith   

Born in Ohio 31 May 1834 Died Durand Illinois 22 January 1916 Aged 81

Buried in Durand Winnebago County Illinois Laona Cemetery

My Great Grandmother
Mary S Smith Married Eugene Baker Rowley in 1880
Born  in Durand, Winnebago, Illinois, Died 1917
Daughter of Clark Smith & Charlotte Ann Clark
Mother of Clair S Rowley, May Baker Potter 1883-1972   Charlotte Rowley Van Sickle 1888-1980, Edna Rowley Morey 1892-1990,, Cecile Rowley Caven 1897-1957

Michael Photographs the Airedales

My grandson Michael (14) is the guest blogger today. Michael took some photos of Henry and Josie, their Airedale Terriers, over Memorial Day weekend.

The family visited the other grandparents in Virginia and celebrated Mark’s birthday.

Thanks for sharing your photos, Michael.

You captured the humorous duo!  Keep on photographing, too.

xxoo FF Ruthie

New steps on the back deck in Ohio. Debating whether or not to take them.

In 2013 I blogged your first Airedale, Murphy, under that very same tree in Virginia. 

Spalted Maple Piece for Meditation

When cleaning out a desk last week, I was reunited with this piece of smooth polished wood. The maker emphasized it was for meditation, NOT a worry stone.

Spalted Maple. What is it? Wood that has started to decay. Botanical Designation: Not a distinct species of maple; spalting is a fungal discoloration caused by partially decayed wood.”

I bought it from The Wood Rasp Shop vendor at the Pittsburgh Indie Knit and Spin at the Ace Hotel.

In fact, I posted a photo of the maker and his other wood items for sale in November 2018-the post titled Not a Worry Stone .

(I did google worry stones and they can be purchased in bulk)

Incredibly smooth wood to rub between your fingers
David Manos and his wife at the Ace Hotel a snippet from the original post
His website is not active unfortunately as he made all sorts of Really beautiful wooden shawl pins and buttons.

Someone Tied a Yellow Ribbon on a Tree To Remember

The gold letters on the yellow ribbon spelled “Cousin”.

Left as a remembrance.

The sign that someone came and put the ribbons there as a tribute touched our hearts even though we didn’t know the person.

Steve and I saw the ribbon on a tree when we were walking in the park. Then we noticed the bench with the memorial plaque right by the tree. We’d not seen it before.

The obituary told how he passed, peacefully under an oak tree in Highland Park, after doing what he loved – hiking. He had a congenital heart condition. So young.

I came home and googled the name and if you click it you can read about his life. Christopher Emmons

The ribbon on the tree, the memorial bench and the message on the plaque, so poignant. Can’t even fathom how much his family misses him.

Storms a Coming by Jane Miller – Guest Blogger

 

Storms a coming.

by Jane Miller 

My husband and I live with his mother in an old farmhouse with parts dating back to 1842. Except for the window lined porch that faces west, the house is structurally the way it was 100 years ago when the third generation of the Hunter family lived here. Their ancestors were a Scottish Presbyterian family who cleared this portion of Depreciation Lands.

Often my thoughts go to life as it may have been stretched out over a nearly 200 year history when the family sustained themselves with their labors in the fields and there were horses in the barn. Now the horses are gone. The farm is in transition. Our work of the day includes for me, the care giving for my mother-in-law, Lois—almost 90—and the patients my husband “sees” on a computer in his office that was at one time our dining room and in generations past, a kitchen. The beauty of the evolving nature is one constant. We especially enjoy our summer evenings.

On one of the first warm nights this year we sat together on the back deck after mom was in bed, I grieved the loss of the horses and a pasture plowed under by Farmer Beahm, who will soon plant field corn. The sun was heading for its sweet spot between the tree-lined hills as clouds gathered bits of gray.

I remembered an evening nearly 35 years ago on May 31, 1985, the evening a 25-mile long twister took out the trees of that hill and my mother and father-in-law, along with our three-year-old son, hit the basement. I think they wanted a room with windows to better see a storm a coming in addition to daily witnessing the beauty of nature.

On this May evening—one of the first ones a coat and blanket not needed—another storm was brewing. It was May 12, just before the world began opening up to our “new normal” and all of the unknowns this will bring. Then in the skies, a real storm collected clouds and we were fascinated as we watched where the sun would soon disappear in the West. Rick had a Scotch in his hand. I had my camera.

The beauty of the moment mesmerized us and we didn’t heed the warnings of the winds. Our eyes were on the skies, when rain pelted us. For the moment we laughed through the winds, making sure my camera was safe and Rick anchored down the furniture we had to evacuate.

I thought of the storms of the past and the ones that are brewing and a word came to my mind about life on the farm. Resilience. Crops fail. You replant. Animals that sustain you will die. It’s not a moment to moment feeling. It’s a joy that doesn’t depend upon what is happening to you. It’s about being grateful for every moment in every time.

Life goes on and it’s always day by day. Farmers look for their rewards at the end of the day.

Storm a Coming