Aubergine Yarn Color in Two Lights

Aubergine yarn in two light- a great color name, isn’t it?

A friend gave me a sweater’s worth of Harrisville Designs Highland Yarn. Wooly warmth for next winter! I never worked with it before and it is nice to wind and knit. I’d like to finish it before summer’s full heat kicks in.

I used my iPhone to document progress of the sweater (pattern is Larch by Pam Allen, available on Ravelry).

I snapped the front, then the back. Ooops, the flash went off in the second shot.

Sweater in two lights

Available light-

Electronic Flash below –

some of you will want to pick off the little fuzzy lint in the photo There’s a bit of vegetative matter in this wonderful yarn

Watch this two minute video to see how wool is milled and spun into yarn – Harrisville, New Hampshire.

A Day in the Life of an American Woolen Mill

From their website-

“Highland is one of our flagship yarns, available in 64 tweedy, heathered, woolen spun colors. This yarn is perfect for a cozy New England sweater, or a favorite pair of mitts. The yarn was engineered to wear better and better with every wash. Don’t let the crunch fool you. After 10 years of constant wear, you’ll know why we spun it this way.”

Pittsburgh’s Indie Knit & Spin

You know how much I love different yarns and all the possibilities they inspire.

Last Saturday I went with a friend to the Ace Hotel in East Liberty to check out the Pittsburgh Indie Knit & Spinevent, held in the former YMCA gym.  The “boutique hotel” was hopping, serving lunch and drinks and coffee, while eager knitters perused the booths.

A vendor at one booth was wearing this pin.Two dinosaurs winding yarn!

Although the vendor preferred anonymity she was more than happy to share the story of her quirky and creative pin.  She told me to google Malojos   So fun. Meet the designer of the pin who lives in Chicago About Natalie Have you seen the 14K gold gauge rings she makes?

I limited myself to purchasing a single skein of sparkle yarn named “The Shire” ( my first sparkle yarn)  HandDyed by Trisha Eliason of Gypsy Stardust Yarn and Fiber Shop. 

Good Water and Co. is a mother-daughter team dedicated to bringing the world a better knitting bag. Based in central Pennsylvania, each Good Water and Co. bag is handcrafted from start to finish, with no two bags being exactly alike. We are dedicated to providing knitters and crocheters with funky and innovative solutions to everyday problems.  – from their Website

They had many great bags and had repurposed dresser scarves sewn into project bags to hold knitting projects or whatever else you might think of-

The Ace Hotel hosts Knitting in the Knook every third Tuesday, too. Offering tea and a cozy place to sit and knit.  My friend Ann and I went to knit in February and everyone was so nice. That’s how I learned about the Indie Knit & Spin Event.

I’d rather be…..

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Knitting, of course.   The Weekly Photo Challenge created by Krista Stevens 

“How would you fill in the blank?”    I’d Rather Be…

If given the choice, what would you rather be doing, right now?

So many possibilities.

I was knitting at a friend’s home, Finishing up these PairPerfect Socks.  The Regia yarn 75% wool 25% nylon designed by Arne and Carlos is dyed so it turns out looking like you really did something fancy.  You get two identical socks, knit from the top down.  When the colors change, you go on to the next step.  It falls into almost mindless knitting category.

Harmony, Maine Yarn

I’ve been to Harmony, Pennsylvania but not Harmony, Maine. Recently I watched a Kristy Glass Knits knitting video where she told about Bartlett Yarn Woolen Mills (since 1821) manufacturing yarn.

The man on the video featuring Hudson Valley Sheep and Wool said, “Bartlett is a mainstay for us. This is your grandma’s yarn. This is real true farm yarn.  Or your great grandmother’s yarn.  At Christmas, a lot of people buy it to make stockings .”   Well, I’m getting a head start this year. My friend Deb has been knitting Christmas stockings and inspired me to knit them for my grandchildren.  You might remember her gauge difficulties with her Christmas stocking- I blogged it last January.

The grandmother who taught me to knit was born 126 years ago on February 7th.

That very day, I got on the phone and spoke with a nice woman and told her what I wanted to knit.  Three days later I got a box of yarn from Harmony, Maine. She helped me select Spruce Heather, Cranberry and Natural.  I added the other heather to create sock monkeys on the stockings, which I graphed. Mark’s old stocking from childhood served as a guide and I found a vintage knitting pattern  from the 60’s on Etsy to serve as a template for the actual stocking.  The woman who knit Mark’s stocking in Clarion PA was named Jane.  My plan is to knit one a month and have them ready for NEXT Christmas. For the grandchildren.  Getting an early start this year.  And yes I did finish James’ sweater and he loves it!  

Knitting bowls gifted from Toni, Laura and Bill.

Already I realize my monkey is a bit too tall.  Back to the drawing board. 

HANDYED Yarn in BERLIN at Die Wollnerin

Meet Sabine Bornemann.

Hand Dyer of gorgeous yarn and yarn shop owner in the Schoenberg Neighborhood –Die Wollnerin .Very close to Winterfeld Platz.

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Handcrafted little zipper bags for notions,  stitched by another woman (whose name I will add when I get it)

42608A5F-9241-40DE-B9A0-B509734CD410AB43D938-8889-4D52-8CA1-64969D125B6BMy first trip I bought a single skein of this lucious Alpaca Silk Cashmere and then made a second trip to buy another skein.  My last day in Berlin I bought the hand dyed sock yarn of the loveliest merino and a bit of nylon for endurance.  On my final day, I took Sabine’s photo as I said I would for the People at Work Series. Thank you Sabine. Your shop is wonderfully inspiring to me.

Looking  forward to my return visit in the Spring.

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A Kind Person Found My Hat

Friday’s long walk all around Schoenberg resulted in my lost knit hat. Too dark when I got back to head out and try to find it. I was disappointed I lost it.

 

Saturday morning I took a half mug of coffee and retraced my steps. Three blocks away on Eisenacher Strasse, near the Little Witch playground,

I saw my hat hanging from a bush.

Thank you kind person.

I felt fortunate to find it. Made my day.

 

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You might remember this post in November 2015 of the hat being knit Sockhead Hat

(And it has a link to Kelly McClure’s pattern)

 

5A7D9579-66F7-4E0B-BFC4-70487FF04626Knitters know how long it takes to knit a hat with sock yarn on US size one /2.25mm needles. And traveling in November you need a warm hat.

PUMPKIN hat season- again

There’s been a lot of buzz about the early appearance of pumpkin spice lattes. Not too much about pumpkin hats.

People gripe about rushing the season. It’s a short window for pumpkin hats.

Plus, as babies age and turn into toddlers with their own fashion sense, they may reject sporting a pumpkin on their head!

Spoiler Alert: These two knitted pumpkin hats are for my first cousins twice removed. (Or my first cousin’s new grandson and his big sister.)

The pattern Punkin’Head is by Tara Thomsen and is available for free on Ravelry.    

Color: Bittersweet  Yarn: Premier Yarns Everyday: Deborah Norville Collection

(Wash and dry with ease for mom)

Two years ago I knit eight of these in a week.

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Yarn: The Daily Prompt

Yarn is the Daily Prompt at WordPress. Not a photo challenge but Michelle W says  “Write a new post in response to today’s one-word prompt.”  YARN

Spin it, weave it, hook it,

graft it, embroider, wind it in a ball.

Hoard it, stash it, collect skeins to knit.

Knit and purl mittens, ribbed pumpkins, scarves

no one in your family or list of friends

ever asked to receive.

“Mom, I think we all have enough hats. ”

Create shawls of comfort, like hugs

striped socks and hooded baby sweaters

with duck buttons or monkeys.

Think of the recipient while you repeat

the motions of each stitch.

In, around, down through and off

In, around, down through and off

In, around, down through and off-

off the needles.

Tens of thousands stitches with strands of yarn

turn into garments, stave off the chill.

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