Goats Along the Monongahela

Tuesday morning I met two good friends for brunch. We used to teach together at Greenfield School years ago. Although I’d written it on my calendar, I’m so used to not going out much I had to receive a text from Donna asking if I was on my way. Oooops!

After we ate, Sue and I walked along the River Trail. We had a couple of years to catch up with one another.

Donna, we are so sorry you missed the goats!

We saw this sign first, as Sue had told me it was one of the nations busiest rivers for barge traffic.

As we walked along the trail, (which goes all the way to Washington DC and Sue’s sons have biked it) we saw an electric fence and this sign

Allegheny GoatScape at work

Sue spotted the goats as I was taking photos of the underbelly of the Homestead Grays Bridge

A working goat, consuming pounds of vegetation everyday
Homestead Grays Bridge over the Monongahela River

I’d posted about goats at the tea store in Millvale Landscaping Goats at Knit Night and also at a Rent a Goat at Pittsburgh Botanical Garden in Oakdale a couple of years ago. And you might remember I booked a Goat With a Note for a zoom meeting.

Remembering Poet and Friend Dorothy Holley on Her Birthday

Two posts reblogged honoring

Dorothy Holley Poet, Friend post from 2010 click for slideshow

May 15, 1923 – June 6, 2010.
Link to her obituary

____________________________________________________

Dorothy Holley’s Iris from her garden are in the photo below replanted by fellow poet and friend Liane Norman, who is the author of I Dug Up the Iris

I Dug Up the Iris

in Dorothy’s garden
to plant in the soaked

soil of mine, memorial
to her each spring

when they’ll open
complicated ruffles

and flourishes, purple
or blue with speckled

throats. They’ll rise
out of rhizomes

sprawling at soil’s
surface like the joints

of my old  hands
anchoring the tall

stalks and frilly petals.
This morning

in the brief breath
of cool I dug shallow

trenches for this legacy,
this pantry of pollens

the bees prospect,
insects with lives

beyond what the mere
gardener knows.

Liane Ellison Norman, a Madwoman in the Attic, has published two books of poetry, The Duration of Grief and Keep(www.smokeandmirrorspress.com). She has published poems in 5AM, Kestrel, North American Review, Grasslimb, Rune, Voices from the Attic anthologies and the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Her poem “What There’d Been” won the Wisteria Prize in 2006 from Paper Journey Press.

reblogged On the occasion of the birthday of poet Dorothy Holley http://rutheh.com/tag/dorothy-holley-poet/

Mug Shots

The title of today’s post was created by my friend Joanne in Florida . We were talking on the phone about the different types of mugs people have in their homes. Think about the clunky white mugs in a diner, sometime decorated with a single stripe near the rim. What do your mugs say about you?

One afternoon my friend Vincie made a cup of tea. She asked me “ Do you prefer a thick lipped mug or a thin lipped mug?” Hmmmmmmm. I can tell you I had to think about it. Here’s what I learned about my preferences.

When I make a cup of coffee with a paper filter in a cone, I’m choosing a thick lipped mug. When I make a cup of tea I find I’m reaching for a think lipped China mug. I’d never really thought about my preferences before she asked me. I usually choose a family picture mug in the morning.

So I asked a few friends and family, who follow the blog, to send me some photos of their mugs. Mug racks snd mug trees seem out of style although there are hundreds of stock photos of them available .

What kind of mug do you choose? Do you have matching mugs or a hodge podge, mismatched collection? thin lipped, thick lipped, white interior, or whatever is on hand?

Joanne’s six white mugs, all matching.
Joanne can’t abide a dark interior to drink from.
Joanne’s other mug with the Canadian flag
My mugs are a hodge podge mismatched collection on this shelf. There were more in the dishwasher Anna’s second grade drawing on the left, Steve’s Edvard Munch Scream, family photo mugs created by Marlene and sent as presents. There are two gifts from former students.


(Don’t put photo mugs in the dishwasher!)
My friend Vincie has used each of these mugs for a period of time. The one on the right is in use now.
Afternoon tea with a thick lipped on the left and a thin lipped on the right thanks V and G
A gift from a woolswapper representing common interest- Knitting
Special Occasion Gift mug
A thin lipped mug called a beaker.
Perfect for a hot cup of tea
Amy’s mugs with Polish Pottery, Best Grandma and her Yarn Store mug
Colleen says- Loved all the mugs on your blog Ruth. After a lot of downsizing and a little editing this is what happens here. Joanne and Katherine prefer the yellow mugs for tea and I like the Union Jack unless I’m having tomato soup and then it’s the yellow. And, you’ll never see dark in my mugs either.
I think I need a cup of tea.
Perhaps you’ll join me….
Colleen

Sunday Guest Blog from Ottawa

This guest blog is from my friend Joanne’s sister, Mary, in Ottawa, Canada.

“They are little goldfinches in their winter colorings and fluffed up against the minus 18 (Celsius = minus 0.4 degrees Fahrenheit) temperatures….In the spring they start turning yellow and then are really pretty. We get a lot of both gold and purple finches …. and chickadees, redpolls, cardinals of course, big and small woodpeckers, blue jays, and many others. Wild turkeys occasionally, the dreaded grackles and crows. Right now with the deep snow the birds spend more time hiding in the woods somewhere so today was a nice surprise.“

Saturday Morning from the Kitchen Window

Kawandi Nearing Completion in Nova Scotia- guest blog

Colleen’s Kawandi (definition below) she is working on now, lots of hand stitching, nearing completion.

Also Photos below of two quilts Colleen completed in Fall 2021

Colleen writes from Nova Scotia

The bright colours help when things can get a bit grey and dreary – a nice escape.

Handstitched Kawandi by Colleen

The Kawandi are all hand sewn from bits and pieces so it’s relaxing. I took a Zoom class Sujata Shah to learn how they’re made. Margaret Fabrizio is the kawandi maker who inspired me most. She is in her early 90s now and does amazing work. She used to be a world class harpsichord player (played Carnegie Hall) and I believe a professor in California among other things. She is on YouTube and has very colourful stories to tell including one about her friendship with MFK Fisher.” Colleen

Kawandi is a style of quilt created by the Siddi people of India, traditionally sewn by hand with scraps and are improvisational and frequently made of saris snd used clothing.”

Recent Quilt stitched by Colleen
Fall 2021 Quilt stitched by Colleen

If you’ve been following the blog, Colleen made me a quilted mug rug in 2011 and here’s the blog post

UPS Surprise package holds Color of the Year

Link to Pantone Color of the Year.  2022 Very Peri.

We were on a Zoom knitting meeting and the UPS truck pulled up in front of my house.  Just as we were talking.  Joanne ( in Florida) said go get the package!  She had sent it.

I opened it up and discovered she’d sent me a colorful mug, filled with shortbread wrapped in the same color. So fun. Thank you dear friend.

The only problem is the photograph reads the Very Peri as blue but it Is NOT blue

She’s planning to knit with yarn in that color.

A Friend’s Dishes Made Me Laugh

How about this bowl? There’s a fly in your soup! What are these fun dishes, I asked?

Calamityware

Created by artist/ retired graphic designer Don Moyer. Read about how he took a classic Blue Willow plate “ The Calamityware series started in 2011 when I inherited a traditional, Willow-pattern plate and decided to sketch it in my notebook. I couldn’t resist the temptation to add a pterodactyl in the sky”

Check out the TCBW collection. That’s Things Could Be Worse

When was the last time you looked at a dish and laughed?

Sequence

A friend brought over this warm treat of Pear Apple Crisp on Sunday afternoon. She was going to come over Monday morning to sew but then the Crisp would no longer be crisp but soggy.

The flavors of fall, cinnamon and ginger. I took it out on the front porch.

Added some vanilla ice cream on the warm fruit. I saved a little for Steve to enjoy later.

What an unexpected and delicious treat.

There was almond flour snd walnuts too, making it so crisp.