Storms a Coming by Jane Miller – Guest Blogger

 

Storms a coming.

by Jane Miller 

My husband and I live with his mother in an old farmhouse with parts dating back to 1842. Except for the window lined porch that faces west, the house is structurally the way it was 100 years ago when the third generation of the Hunter family lived here. Their ancestors were a Scottish Presbyterian family who cleared this portion of Depreciation Lands.

Often my thoughts go to life as it may have been stretched out over a nearly 200 year history when the family sustained themselves with their labors in the fields and there were horses in the barn. Now the horses are gone. The farm is in transition. Our work of the day includes for me, the care giving for my mother-in-law, Lois—almost 90—and the patients my husband “sees” on a computer in his office that was at one time our dining room and in generations past, a kitchen. The beauty of the evolving nature is one constant. We especially enjoy our summer evenings.

On one of the first warm nights this year we sat together on the back deck after mom was in bed, I grieved the loss of the horses and a pasture plowed under by Farmer Beahm, who will soon plant field corn. The sun was heading for its sweet spot between the tree-lined hills as clouds gathered bits of gray.

I remembered an evening nearly 35 years ago on May 31, 1985, the evening a 25-mile long twister took out the trees of that hill and my mother and father-in-law, along with our three-year-old son, hit the basement. I think they wanted a room with windows to better see a storm a coming in addition to daily witnessing the beauty of nature.

On this May evening—one of the first ones a coat and blanket not needed—another storm was brewing. It was May 12, just before the world began opening up to our “new normal” and all of the unknowns this will bring. Then in the skies, a real storm collected clouds and we were fascinated as we watched where the sun would soon disappear in the West. Rick had a Scotch in his hand. I had my camera.

The beauty of the moment mesmerized us and we didn’t heed the warnings of the winds. Our eyes were on the skies, when rain pelted us. For the moment we laughed through the winds, making sure my camera was safe and Rick anchored down the furniture we had to evacuate.

I thought of the storms of the past and the ones that are brewing and a word came to my mind about life on the farm. Resilience. Crops fail. You replant. Animals that sustain you will die. It’s not a moment to moment feeling. It’s a joy that doesn’t depend upon what is happening to you. It’s about being grateful for every moment in every time.

Life goes on and it’s always day by day. Farmers look for their rewards at the end of the day.

Storm a Coming

Ohio River in Rainstorm

Even at half volume, the anniversary party tent captures the downpour at a deafening level. No this post is NOT a Silent Sunday today.

The rain didn’t stop the festivities, but most partygoers took cover inside. Tables laden with food taken into the open garage.

A short video captures the sounds of the deluge.

Neville Island Pennsylvania.

Back to the serious business of partying outdoors, once the rain stopped.  Of course, it stopped and started several times throughout the afternoon.

 

Tower Viewer and Fog on the Allegheny River

This is the view from Butler Street, towards the Highland Park Bridge.  One of the 445 bridges of Pittsburgh.

You can’t see the Allegheny River due to the fog.

The metal view finder is reflecting the street lights.

Did you know the swiveling sightseeing view finder is actually called  TOWER VIEWER – coin operated binoculars ?

Icelandic Bride

Although I’m back home in Pittsburgh, I saw this elegant bride in Reykavik on Saturday night. I’d just taken a photo of a dress in a window and walked while becoming wet in the sleeting cold rain. Just felt magical to see her. I hope she doesn’t mind .