Topiary Takeover at Franklin Park Conservatory

Monday afternoon, Laura, Charlie, and l spent a couple of hours at the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus Ohio. Here are a few example.

The Exhibition Topiary Takeover.

Twenty-five topiaries made of living plants will take over the gardens this summer—fourteen of which have never been seen before! The animal topiaries are filled with plants to mimic the colors and textures of fur, skin, scales and feathers. UNESCO Natural Heritage Sites inspired the animal topiaries and the plantings that surround them. Visit sea creatures from the Great Barrier Reef, a show-stopping peacock from India, a majestic bison of the plains and more

If you’ve followed the blog for a time you’ve seen Topiaries posted here when I visited in 2017

Pool Noodle Carrots and Bricks as Books Yard Art

A true work of yard art.

We even met the artist Karen as she was outside hauling bags of mulch. Laura, Mary and I were walking to meet Charlie at dismissal time. Laura said “I have a surprise for you.” And she walked me to this home of yard art extraordinaire.

Karen explained how she made the carrots with pool noodles and showed us a photo of her winter snowmen made with the same methods.

Pool Noodle Carrots
How About this carrot for yard art ?
Bricks painted to look like books
Fun in every inch
Yes there’s a bathtub back there
Zombie crossing
The balls have been on the Tri Colored Beech Trees for four years

Remembering Poet and Friend Dorothy Holley on Her Birthday

Two posts reblogged honoring

Dorothy Holley Poet, Friend post from 2010 click for slideshow

May 15, 1923 – June 6, 2010.
Link to her obituary

____________________________________________________

Dorothy Holley’s Iris from her garden are in the photo below replanted by fellow poet and friend Liane Norman, who is the author of I Dug Up the Iris

I Dug Up the Iris

in Dorothy’s garden
to plant in the soaked

soil of mine, memorial
to her each spring

when they’ll open
complicated ruffles

and flourishes, purple
or blue with speckled

throats. They’ll rise
out of rhizomes

sprawling at soil’s
surface like the joints

of my old  hands
anchoring the tall

stalks and frilly petals.
This morning

in the brief breath
of cool I dug shallow

trenches for this legacy,
this pantry of pollens

the bees prospect,
insects with lives

beyond what the mere
gardener knows.

Liane Ellison Norman, a Madwoman in the Attic, has published two books of poetry, The Duration of Grief and Keep(www.smokeandmirrorspress.com). She has published poems in 5AM, Kestrel, North American Review, Grasslimb, Rune, Voices from the Attic anthologies and the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Her poem “What There’d Been” won the Wisteria Prize in 2006 from Paper Journey Press.

reblogged On the occasion of the birthday of poet Dorothy Holley http://rutheh.com/tag/dorothy-holley-poet/

Monet Painting Waterlilies at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens

Monet in Bloom, designed by Associate Director of Exhibits Jordyn Melino, is open Sat., May 7 – Sun., Sept. 25.”

A new flower show at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Click link to see more of show.

If you like Impressionist painter Claude Monet you’ll enjoy the colorful displays.

Monet at work

Do you like the scent of lilacs?

I love the old fashioned look of lilacs in the white ironstone pitcher.

But do I like the scent of the bouquet in my house?

I like the scent of lilacs when they are outdoors on the bush, not in the confines of the house.
Reminded me of scent of Hyacinths at Easter.
Pretty intense.
Purple lilacs on the north side of my house
White Lilacs

Paul Robert Van Sickle 11/23/1938 – 10/25/2021

Remembering Paul Robert Van Sickle.

A loving husband, father of three, and a proud grandfather. A brother, a teacher, a gifted musician, gardener, and woodworker.

And our beloved cousin.

Cousin Paul R. Van Sickle, photographed June 2017

We’ve just returned home after celebrating Paul’s life during a Memorial Service at Trinity Episcopal Church in Lenox, Massachusetts last Saturday the 20th. Paul would have loved all the music- the singing, the playing of the organ. It was beautiful. Poignant.

The cousins drove in from Vermont, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. After the service we gathered together at his home to share stories and memories.

Paul built his workshop

I felt moved as I entered Paul’s workshop, behind his home, and inhaled the scent of wood. He could repair things, too. See his tools all lined up? His grandfather’s toolbox on the bench. There’s a wooden toy box in my home that Paul crafted for my son, Mark.

A panorama of his workshop

Paul was a master musician, organist and vocalist. He had a beautiful singing voice. I remember his playing our family piano when he’d visit our home. J.S.Bach was a favorite composer.

Paul’s favorite cookies were my mom’s recipe for Sour Cream Cookies. His wife Susan baked them for the family gathering after the service. My mother baked them for a Paul in the sixties when he’d visit our home. That kitchen was in Morris Plains, New Jersey and he’d visit when he was on leave from the US Army -Ft. Dix, New Jersey.

A sprinkle of cinnamon sugar on top, a pinch of nutmeg in the dough. A soft sugar cookie, moist from the addition of sour cream.
Here’s a photo from June 1974.
Paul and his daughter Amy at my wedding.

It’s hard to sum up a life in a few words. Paul was a blog follower and told me one time I was a little heavy on the photos showing decay. You know those abandoned buildings and discarded furniture pieces, the garbage I post? 😂 We’re going to miss his laughter, his kindness, his generous heart- full of love for all of us.

Here’s a link to his obituary in the Berkshire Edge.

Hymn of Promise Author: Natalie Sleeth (1986). pianist Evan Alperone sung by Tim Silva