The Battle of Homestead

This bronze relief created by sculptor Brian Reneski

July 6, 1892. The Battle of Homestead (click for Rivers of Steel article)

or American Experience:
Carnegie Strike a Homestead Mill

Railroad Bridge over the Monongahela

Ginkgoes in NYC and Pittsburgh

Note: Last night I was adding Veterans photos to the Veterans Gallery and creating a new blog post for Thursday slipped my mind. If you’d like to see the new additions, here’s the link to the Gallery

Ginkgoes

Rich golden fan shaped leaves make the Gingko a stand out this time of year. My sister sent NYC gingko pics snd I had taken one I’d taken here in Pittsburgh.

LeRoy Street NYC
Down the block. LeRoy Street
Golden Streets in Pittsburgh

A Moment of Zen and a Gigantic Crane Operation on Neville Island Guest Blog

A little more than nine miles from downtown Pittsburgh in the Ohio River is  Neville Island , 

Friends Deb and Sy, residents of the island,  are the guest bloggers today- photographs and writing.  This blog post is in two parts.

The first is the moment of Zen sent by Deb to me on my phone and the autumn hillside reflected in the Ohio River and the barge and tug capture the feel of where they live on the island. Peaceful and a gorgeous image.  Thanks Debbie and Sy for creating the blog post today.

 But the day before there was a lot of activity right by their home.

Gigantic Crane Operation Part 2 of the Guest Blog

Sy writes about the crane photos

The photos reveal a crane on a barge that was towed upstream on the
Ohio River, along with an empty barge, from Midland (Beaver County) Pa
to Neville Island.  This crane had a large clamshell bucket, weighing,
according to the owner, approx. 8,500 lbs. EMPTY!

This bucket was utilized to clean out silt from our neighbor’s boat garage. It removed four cubic yards of silt at a time which is a lot of silt!  Muddy
river water would flow into this calm area.  While calm, the silt
would fall out of the water and onto the river bottom in the boat
garage. This boat garage was last cleaned out in a similar fashion
about 11 or 12 years ago. This crew removed approximately 8 to 10 feet
of silt from the river bottom in the boat garage. 

Before this calm area was a boat garage, it was part of the storage area for the
upstream gate to a lock on the Ohio River that was constructed in the
late 1890s and decommissioned in the early 1930s when the present
locks went into operation. The steel lock gate was removed and
utilized for scrap metal around the time of WWII.

Additionally, an old, heavy steel barge cover (at least 60 or 70
years old and more than 2000 lbs.) was removed by the crane as the
boat garage only utilized two such covers and this third cover was
deteriorating and not really needed. All of this work was accomplished
in about 4 hours.”

The crane arrives

And there they go