Pittsburgh Signature Sandwich

There aren’t many places open on Sunday night, late. You’re headed home and stop in to get their #2 Best Seller -To Go. Vinegary Coleslaw and Fries right in between the thick slices of Italian bread.

Primanti Bros. In The Strip District

I took a few pictures while Steve was inside getting the sandwich.  We split one. It’s sufficient.

Fresh Cut Fries Not From a Freezer

 

French Fries, Pommes Frites, Chips, Fries.  These are fresh cut fries, fried to perfection.

The frozen, thinner ones from the freezer have been around since the 1940’s,  You can find these frozen fries in plastic bags in the grocery store freezer section and they are served in most diners and fast food restaurants. There is no comparison to fresh cut potatoes, plunged into hot oil, drained and sprinkled with salt.

Sometimes fried twice for that extra crispy exterior and light creamy interior. Soggy and limp is the worst.  The type of potato will affect the end result.  Russet/Idaho potatoes are mentioned in many recipes and if you want to become a student of types of potatoes click this Guide to Every Potato You Need to Know

Eating fries may clog your arteries and make one fat, but they can certainly satisfy the palate.  Some people accompany them with ketchup, vinegar, mayonnaise and slather them with cheese or gravy and even tomato sauce. You’ve probably heard of the famous Pittsburgh Primanti Bros sandwich with the fries and slaw right inside the sandwich. (photo of one here)

Here’s Bon Appétit Magazine’s Kelly Dobkin’s “culinary school method” for fail-proof, perfect French fries Secret to Perfect French Fries recipe 

Need less fat, you can bake crispy fries in a 450 degree oven (recipe here)

Three Men & a Bicyclist on Smallman Street

Waiting in the car for Steve to get the Primanti’s sandwiches, I saw these men head north on Smallman Street.  They’d just left Primanti Brothers. And then the bicyclist joined in the frame, that time of day when the streetlights come on, but it’s not dark yet. Unable to determine how the street got named but am sure with more research I’ll find it. You can see all the loading docks on the left for the fruit and vegetable deliveries. It’s a really wide street.

St. Stanislaus in the background on the right, completed in 1892.