Robot Hall of Fame at Carnegie Science Center

A couple of weeks ago Jack was here on Spring Break snd I took a photo of him with favorite robots C-3PO and R2D2.

When the family visited last week, Laura, Charlie and I went to the Carnegie Science Center. Charlie was eager to get to Roboworld to see R2-D2 and C-3PO

Jack on Spring Break in March 2022
What Charlie saw when he went to look for R2D2 and C-3PO oh no!

Carnegie Science Center has moved the robots to the Rangos Theatre lobby here’s an article about the change.

Laura read a sign telling us where to find our favorite robots.

I knit Charlie a robot a couple years ago. Clinky. He likes robots.

Under the Bridge

Homestead Grays Bridge, built in 1936, was formerly called the Homestead High Level Bridge. I Pulled into a parking space to shoot the underbelly Wednesday night. The blue light against the night sky. The bridge spans the Monongahela River but this part is over the Waterfront shopping area.

“It is notable as the first bridge to incorporate the Wichert Truss, which uses a quadrilateral shape over each support, into its design. This made the truss statically determinate, so that forces in the structural members could be calculated.” Wikipedia

A 2017 blog post I did of bridges going over the Monongahela shows a different view of this same bridge.

City Stairs Renovation on the North Side

October 15, 2020

October 16, 2020

In 2011 I posted about the City Sidewalk Stairs. And again in July 2018

CITY STEPS IN PITTSBURGH.

from July 2018

”Pittsburgh has more public staircases (800+) than any city in the United States. The City’s steps connect communities and provide residents access to transit and other amenities” http://pittsburghpa.gov/

A3335182-92FA-4B9B-B167-F089D90FD769Garfield   The Steps to Ft. Pitt School

Sidewalks can be steps, too.

 

Book by Bob Regan   Photos by Tim Fabian 588B00B2-BDC7-4C68-BE5A-A04539FF0555

 

Pittsburgh topography requires innovation- how to get from the bottom of a hill to the top.  And in 2010 the snow covered stairs students climbed to Ft. Pitt School.

Author Martin Aurand’s book describes the formation of the topography of Pittsburgh’s hills and valleys. The Spectator and the Topographical City examines Pittsburgh’s built environment as it relates to the city’s unique topography. Martin Aurand explores the conditions present in the natural landscape that led to the creation of architectural forms; man’s response to an unruly terrain of hills, hollows, and rivers. From its origins as a frontier fortification to its heyday of industrial expansion; through eras of City Beautiful planning and urban Renaissance to today’s vision of a green sustainable city; Pittsburgh has offered environmental and architectural experiences unlike any other place.”