Cucina Vitale Dinner on the South Side

We finally made it for Saturday night dinner on the South Side.  We’d been meaning to go eat at Cucina Vitale ever since Vincie discovered this dining gem in a Post-Gazette article by Dan Gigler in late January.

Cucina Vitale 

White tablecloths, cut red roses in glass vases, excellent service, delicious food cooked to perfection and served expertly.

Our Antipasti started with black and green olives, Roasted red pepper hummus-like spread and garlic infused olive oil in which to dip the crusty bread. Every bite was delicious. A dish of Greens and creamy Beans was shared. There are no words! What other descriptor can I use besides DELICIOUS?

Followed by the soup of the day which was Tomato Bisque with Basil  (Traditional Wedding Soup is always on the menu)

The specials were Chilean Sea Bass and Lump Crabmeat with a Lemon Caper Compound Butter with sides of Broccoli Rabe and Roasted New Potatoes.

And I ordered the  Cheese Ravioli topped with Medallions in Gorgonzola Sauce with a drizzle of Balsamic.

Tempting house made desserts of Cannoli, Lemon Cheesecake, Chocolate Cake, Burnt Almond Torte or Tiramisu were offered but we hadn’t left enough room.There are a few things to know if you plan to go-

Reservations are essential. BYOB if you desire and it’s Cash Only.  


GREENS & BEANS                                                                                                                            Escarole, Northern Beans, Garlic, Shallots, White Wine, & Parmesan


The Chilean Sea Bass with Lump Crabmeat and Lemon Caper Compound Butter

The Tomato Basil Soup with a touch of Parmesan


Chef Frank Vitale learned to cook from his Grandmother, in the photo on the restaurant wall.

Shot from across the street as we got into the car.

 

Stained Glass Exhibition Panel at the Heinz History Center

Photographed March 27, 2019 at the Glass Exhibit in Heinz History Center  Pittsburgh PA


The Pittsburgh Stained Glass Studio, mentioned in the exhibit panel at the History Center, was established in 1909

 

“As the craftsman selects the pieces of colored glass and puts them together in various combinations, he becomes more and more fascinated by the infinite variety of effects to be obtained, and to have a profound love and respect for the material that makes this possible.”

–Howard G. Wilbert 1891-1966

from the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation Website

Another Color Photo Appears Black and White

When the outdoor world seems black and white and gray but your photograph is in color. Everyone has had enough of the cold, snow, ice and dark. They’re ready for crocuses and daffodils bursting through the earth, looking for light.

I’ve photographed this tree before. I always like how the snow defines the branches.

Pittsburgh Light Up Night 2007

I was looking for a Throwback Thursday photo and found this black and white shot of the city at night. Light Up Night is in November, the Friday before Thanksgiving and you can see the effort to light up the city with every available watt. I’m pretty sure I could take a better image now so will try to retake this coming November 2019.

Shot from the Duquesne Incline Platform

Tower Viewer and Fog on the Allegheny River

This is the view from Butler Street, towards the Highland Park Bridge.  One of the 445 bridges of Pittsburgh.

You can’t see the Allegheny River due to the fog.

The metal view finder is reflecting the street lights.

Did you know the swiveling sightseeing view finder is actually called  TOWER VIEWER – coin operated binoculars ?

Please Don’t Touch the Magnificent Costumes (All Made of Paper)

The title of today’s post comes from a conversation I had with one of the guards in the gallery.  He has seen two women lie down on the museum floor to look up the dresses ( he thought they had fainted), two men blow on the hanging costumes to get them to move (saliva included) and a 5 or 6 year old ran into the Queen Elizabeth gown the other day.  Today I saw a woman reach to touch the gossamer lace on a collar.  It’s hard to fathom that the gorgeous costumes/sculptures are made entirely of paper but they are.   

Today at the Frick Art Museum we viewed the exhibition of Isabelle de Borchgrave : Fashioning Art from Paper

My sister Mary reads about the Isabelle de Borchgrave paper sculpture commissioned by the Frick after the Peter Paul Rubens’ Portrait of Princess of Condé, Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency (1594-1650) 




You can touch the paper on this table in the rotunda.