Ruffled Mushrooms on a Rotting Stump

You know I’m fascinated by fungi. No, this is not to eat! but there so many varieties and different ways they grow. They’re found in unexpected places. This crop on a rotting stump.

A Google image search says it might be this type of ruffled mushroom.

Trichaptum abietinum is a species of poroid fungus in the order Hymenochaetales. It is saprophytic, growing from dead conifer wood. The white-gray cap is 1–4 cm wide and usually no more than .5 thick, shelved and fanlike, with brownish and leathery flesh. The spores are white, cylindrical, and smooth. Wikipedia

Dead Trees Standing 3 views

The first two views – the same tree in Highland Park. This tree has lived a long time. It has come to the end of its life.

With sunlight from behind camera
With sunlight in front of camera
A dead tree in Columbus Ohio

A

Might be Tree Parasites?

I saw these leaves on the parking lot when I picked up Charlie from Camp. I don’t think they are a good sign but I’m not sure. I tried to identify them. Maybe a blog reader will know.

Do you know what the bumps are under these leaves?

A Bald Cypress in Clintonville Ohio

A deciduous conifer -the Bald Cypress
In Whetstone Park by the playground and library

I used the inaturalist Seek app to identify this magnificent tree

This tree has inspired much poetry and prose over the centuries due to its melancholy and mysterious appearance. Longfellow refers to its “towering and tenebrous boughs” that “waved like banners that hang on the walls of ancient cathedrals” in his 1847 poem, Evangeline. Naturalist John Muir in his book Thousand-Mile Walk refers to “the dark, mysterious cypress woods which cover everything” and states that “night is coming on and I am filled with indescribable loneliness.”- click text for ArborDay source

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