Yolanda by Miriam Lenk

Yolanda by Miriam Lenk 

Walked by this giant bronze sculpture in front of a bank a few times and it certainly brought body image to mind.

http://www.artconnect.com/projects/yolanda-2003-2006-bronce-320x-140x-140-cm-investititionsbank-berlin-bundesallee-210-nachodstrasse-berlin

Please Don’t Touch the Magnificent Costumes (All Made of Paper)

The title of today’s post comes from a conversation I had with one of the guards in the gallery.  He has seen two women lie down on the museum floor to look up the dresses ( he thought they had fainted), two men blow on the hanging costumes to get them to move (saliva included) and a 5 or 6 year old ran into the Queen Elizabeth gown the other day.  Today I saw a woman reach to touch the gossamer lace on a collar.  It’s hard to fathom that the gorgeous costumes/sculptures are made entirely of paper but they are.   

Today at the Frick Art Museum we viewed the exhibition of Isabelle de Borchgrave : Fashioning Art from Paper

My sister Mary reads about the Isabelle de Borchgrave paper sculpture commissioned by the Frick after the Peter Paul Rubens’ Portrait of Princess of Condé, Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency (1594-1650) 




You can touch the paper on this table in the rotunda.

Reflection at CMOA Last Day of 2018

Mary and I went to the Carnegie Museum of Art yesterday, the last day of 2018.

Here we are reflected in artist Dan Grahams Heart Pavilion sculpture.

Our weight appears to fluctuate depending on the curve of the mirror. Our legs reminiscent of Giacometti figures in the last shot. Even with all our holiday eating!

We’ve had a nice time together over the Christmas vacation.

One Night in Oslo

The Knitting Cruise ended Thursday morning and we took a bus to the Kirkenes Airport, dispersing to various destinations. I’m headed to Reykjavík via one night in Oslo. After supper I walked and walked around the city, realizing my time in Oslo is short.

Here’s my night gallery of Oslo.

Sculpture Artist Dominique Scaife

Meet Sculpture Artist Dominique Scaife.

Here she is with her award winning sculpture, Burgh, at Pittsburgh Society of Artists Da Burgh Show (Images of Pittsburgh) at Framehouse and Jask Gallery in Lawrenceville through June 30th.

IMG_7351IMG_7352The show’s juror was Linda Price-Sneddon

“Price-Sneddon is an artist-educator and graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston Studio Program. Her multidisciplinary work explores the basic human interrelationship and identification with the landscape.”  from Pittsburgh Press Releases

Congratulations, Dominique!

 

 

The Real World by Tom Otterness

img_0539Artist Tom Otterness created The Real World installed in 1992

(You can see more of his artwork Life Underground at the 14th Street-Eighth Avenue Subway Station)

Also known as Penny Park  along the Hudson River in New York City.

Michael, Jack and Maura enjoyed exploring the bronze sculptures.

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We were headed to the Staten Island Ferry- at the end of the day our walking total was just shy of nine miles.

Chainsaw Artist Transforms Trees into Art

Bridgeport, Washington is a small town on the Columbia River, near  Chief Joseph Dam.  The town’s old sycamore trees, which lined the main street, were in sad shape but instead of being cut down, chainsaw artist Jacob Lucas has transformed them into incredible sculptures.

With a CHAINSAW!

(And by the way he does custom orders if you have a tree stump in need of being transformed.)

Salmon, quail, wolves, cougars, bear, the logging industry, deer, farming, pelicans, beavers, dragonfly, bees and honeycomb, eagles and other native species are a few of the themes of the tree sculptures.

See an owl swoop down to catch  jackrabbit below.

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To get an idea of the scaleIMG_2712

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200 Tons of Sand Divided by 5

My friend Roberta called me today. What a great find for the blog! She told me about the cool competition happening in front of the main Carnegie Library.  Pittsburgh themed and sand sculptures being created by five international teams of two, right under a big tent in Oakland.

The competition is over Friday afternoon at three-“Trowels Down”

200 tons of sand from a quarry was delivered to the walkway in front of the museum, then moved by a front loader.

Each team received 40 tons of sand to sculpt.

IMG_2860International Sand Sculptor Katsuhiko Chaen  has a Sand Museum in Japan

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IMG_2917Teammate Bruce Phillips from San Diego concentrating on details of “Dear Andy”.

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Teammates Andrius Petkus from Lithuania and Maxim Gazendam the Netherlands creating “The Pearl”IMG_2912“The Pearl”

 

 

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“Master of Steel”

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Jon Woodworth from Texas and Karen Fralich from Ontario Canada work on their sculpture “Master of Steel”

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Fergus Mulvany from Ireland and Thomas Koet from Florida

“The Renaissance of Pittsburgh”

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“Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio  The Three Graces of Pittsburgh”

Teammates Ilya Filimontsev from Russia &  Susanne Ruseler of the Netherlands

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IMG_2943Sifting the sand to get rid of the rubble

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IMG_2946Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh- Main

IMG_2942If you want to try your hand at sculpting sand, here is a link from Katsuhiko Chaen  to the Sand Museum in Japan on how to do it.

Sandcityspectacular

and FB page

Sculptor Transformed 100 year old Norway Maple Tree Stump into Revolutionary Wartime Presbyterian Minister

That lengthy title gives it all away -Another post of last week’s time in Philadelphia – 

Sculptor and excellent ice carver, Roger Wing, transformed a 100 year old Norway Maple stump into an impressive likeness of Pastor George Duffield (b.1732-d.1790).

(Click Roger Wing Sculptor and you can see more examples of his amazing sculpture.)

Walking back to the hotel, I passed by The Old Pine Street Church Graveyard. 

Architect Joseph G. Brin article details information about how this Revolutionary War  Minister’s sermon inspired John Adams to sign the Declaration of Independence.

  
  The wind made the flags billow and flap, making snapping sounds.  
  Unlike the Harmonist Cemetery I posted yesterday, these graves are marked. 

Well, they were marked.

 Years of erosion have made many names difficult to read.