Silent Sunday Guest Blog

My good friend Vincie saw this statue and inscription while walking in the cemetery. Someone visited and left a stone.
Thanks for sending me this image.
Perfect for Silent Sunday

Someone Tied a Yellow Ribbon on a Tree To Remember

The gold letters on the yellow ribbon spelled “Cousin”.

Left as a remembrance.

The sign that someone came and put the ribbons there as a tribute touched our hearts even though we didn’t know the person.

Steve and I saw the ribbon on a tree when we were walking in the park. Then we noticed the bench with the memorial plaque right by the tree. We’d not seen it before.

The obituary told how he passed, peacefully under an oak tree in Highland Park, after doing what he loved – hiking. He had a congenital heart condition. So young.

I came home and googled the name and if you click it you can read about his life. Christopher Emmons

The ribbon on the tree, the memorial bench and the message on the plaque, so poignant. Can’t even fathom how much his family misses him.

Month of May Stitched in Memory- Guest Blog

These photos are from May 1987, taken in Kentucky.  Sent by my good friend Joanne. We were so much younger then, we’re older than that now……

And a tribute to Phyllis George who passed May 14th.

Joanne, Phyllis, Ruth

Ruth – you and I reconnected as Army wives in Fort Knox, KY in 1986 after we both moved there from Germany, where we first met.  You taught me the art of smocking and we spent a lot of time together stitching beautiful outfits for our little girls.  Then we decided to make it a “cottage industry” and created our business Handsmocked in Kentucky.  We took special orders and sold our work in the  Kentucky Arts Council In Louisville … where we attracted the attention of Phyllis George (then wife of the Governor of Kentucky!) .

We had such fun and dreams with our little business, and then all of a sudden we were invited to Phyllis George’s home as a vendor for her Kentucky Derby celebration which featured Kentucky based artists!  What an adventure ….
33 years later I still have a lot of memories and a wardrobe of smocked dresses to hand down to some special little girl.  
My memory of Phyllis George was a gracious, giving woman who cared deeply about Kentucky artisans.   (And she wrote us a check for a handsmocked dress for her daughter.)

Joanne was able to go into her boxes of photos which are all labeled and put her hands on these photos.

Joanne even put her hands on our little brochure.  Her sister did the artwork.

Our daughters Laura and Anna at a tea party, sporting our smocking. This photo is in Germany where both girls were born.

Artist HELÈNE AYLON February 4, 1931 – April 6, 2020

In 2011 I had the privilege to meet and escort artist HELÈNE AYLON to her exhibition being shown at the Andy Warhol Museum. She gave me a signed parchment scroll which I photographed today April 7, 2020 scroll down to see it. 

Artist HELÈNE AYLON February 4, 1931 – April 6, 2020

BLog Post from 2011

ARTIST HELÈNE AYLON AT THE WARHOL MUSEUM

I asked Ms. Aylon  if  I might take her picture (with my iPhone these days)  and she graciously agreed.  Then she suggested we take one under the portrait of Julia Warhol, Andy’s mother.  It was Mother’s Day.

Her exhibit The Word of God: Helène Aylon, The Liberation of G-d and The Unmentionable runs through June 26th


Author of Book  (click for review) Whatever Is Contained Must Be Released: My Jewish Orthodox Girlhood, My Life as a Feminist Artist

 2016 Article about Helene Aylon by Zachary Solomon The 85-Year-Old Avant-Garde Eco-Feminist Artist From Orthodox Brooklyn

Found in a Parking Lot

A poppy made by Disabled Veterans, was lying in a parking lot last Wednesday.

I picked it up and put it in the car. It felt out of season for the Poppy Sales and I don’t know how long it’s been lying there.

But I couldn’t leave it, abandoned.

Stumbling Stones/Stoplersteine Memorials

To remember. Read their names.

As I was photographing one of these brass Stolpersteine, an elderly man came up to us and said in German “it’s important to remember the bad things that happen.”

Artist Gunter Demnig creates the Stoplersteines  and personally places them in the sidewalks, using a small trowel, in front of the residences where individuals and families were taken by the Nazis. They all say “here lived_______” , their name and their dates and the location where they were murdered.

Writer Megan King says in her article https://theculturetrip.com/europe/germany/articles/the-deeper-meaning-behind-berlins-brass-cobblestones/ “These cobblestone plaques that bear a tragic chapter of German history are the open-ended project first initiated in 1996 by the German artist Gunter Demnig. Not only is their message one of remembrance and of personalising the victims by honouring their names, but their purpose is also thought-provoking, aiming to initiate discussion and stimulate thought.”

(Link to another post about the Stolpersteine remembrance project)


The last photo taken at night illustrating how the light catches the brass plaques. Here are a few of the thousands of stolpersteines placed in Berlin but the project has expanded to other countries as well.

Memorial Day Compendium

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Watching her father as Taps played- 2016 Memorial Day Etna, PA

A Day of Remembrance- Originally blogged May 31, 2010   Reblogged in 2016

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 9.46.08 PMMuskingum County   World War II/Korean War Memorial     Zanesville, Ohio

 

Family members plant flowers, trim grass, pull a few weeds, decorate graves of loved ones with wreaths.

One time Mary and I scrubbed lichen off the granite with our toothbrushes.  I saw a watering can hang from a spigot, a metal pipe in the ground.

Boy Scouts place American flags by white marble veterans’ graves.

I remember when Bill played taps and as the clear notes sounded, the wind kicked up, blew swirls of dust and leaves, the sky got dark. And we all felt  a shivering chill.

Each helmet bears a soldier’s name.

Memorial Day 2013 Guest Blog by son Mark Memorial Day 2013 Guest Blog by son Mark

 

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Photo by Mary upstate NY

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Photo by Mary from upstate NY

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Neighbor’s Memorial Flags for Each War

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Poppy

from Memorial Day 2014

Twenty four notes. Taps. 

The Origin of Taps, The Bugler’s Cry  by  “Jari Villanueva, a former ceremonial bugler at Arlington National Cemetery”

from Memorial Day post 2015   Poppies  for Disabled Veterans Assistance Programsimg_6663

 

 

May they all rest in peace and may we never rest until we make peace last.
Thanks for this, Ruth. Too many helmets!
Love, L

Here is a link to Lois’ obituary 2013

 

The Redbud is in Bloom for Easter

Eastern Redbud tree. It was a beautiful day today before the downpour of rain arrived Saturday night. Just look at that blue sky.

A friend planted the Redbud  in my backyard as a memorial to my parents after they’d passed. Thanks, Ginny.

It was my parents favorite type of tree. The way the pink blossoms emerge along the entire branch makes it a stand out amongst the flowering trees.

A Tribute to Jimmy Cvetic

Remembering Jimmy Cvetic  (click for article by Rich Lord)

Vietnam Vet, Police Detective, Boxing Coach and Poet.  Poet is how I came to know him over the years, hearing him read at Hemingway’s Café in Oakland where he organized the Summer Poetry Reading Series for decades. He had an incredibly generous spirit. No one will be able to fill his shoes. He wrote the following poetry books:The Secret Society of Dog, Dog Unleashed, Dog is a Love from Hell, Dog Days published by Lascaux Editions.

Jimmy Cvetic   

September 8, 1949- February 15, 2019

Jimmy with Franco Harris on August 17, 2017 Little Italy Days in Bloomfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh PA.  I photographed them after Franco played in a Bocce game on Cedarville Street.

Click here to read Jimmy Cvetic in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette Saturday Poem : Another God Poem