Wind Chimes in Winter

Wind Chimes in Winter. These Woodstock Chimes made in the USA- were a wedding gift to Laura and James ten years ago- from my my friend Joanne. They’re protected by the porch. They have clear musical tones. These tubes are aluminum.

According to Happy Gardens The Times of India says that wind chimes have been around since 1100BC when ancient a Chinese emperor and civilizations cast the first wind bells called Fenglings

Wikipedia says

Wind chimes are a type of percussion instrumentconstructed from suspended tubes, rods, bells or other objects that are often made of metal or wood. The tubes or rods are suspended along with some type of weight or surface which the tubes or rods can strike when they or another wind-catching surface are blown by the natural movement of air outside.”

Pachelbel’s Canon in D – Woodstock Wedding Chimes


https://youtube.com/shorts/ahJdx9XdYNU?feature=share

A thirty second video of the wind chimes on the front porch

Paul Robert Van Sickle 11/23/1938 – 10/25/2021

Remembering Paul Robert Van Sickle.

A loving husband, father of three, and a proud grandfather. A brother, a teacher, a gifted musician, gardener, and woodworker.

And our beloved cousin.

Cousin Paul R. Van Sickle, photographed June 2017

We’ve just returned home after celebrating Paul’s life during a Memorial Service at Trinity Episcopal Church in Lenox, Massachusetts last Saturday the 20th. Paul would have loved all the music- the singing, the playing of the organ. It was beautiful. Poignant.

The cousins drove in from Vermont, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. After the service we gathered together at his home to share stories and memories.

Paul built his workshop

I felt moved as I entered Paul’s workshop, behind his home, and inhaled the scent of wood. He could repair things, too. See his tools all lined up? His grandfather’s toolbox on the bench. There’s a wooden toy box in my home that Paul crafted for my son, Mark.

A panorama of his workshop

Paul was a master musician, organist and vocalist. He had a beautiful singing voice. I remember his playing our family piano when he’d visit our home. J.S.Bach was a favorite composer.

Paul’s favorite cookies were my mom’s recipe for Sour Cream Cookies. His wife Susan baked them for the family gathering after the service. My mother baked them for a Paul in the sixties when he’d visit our home. That kitchen was in Morris Plains, New Jersey and he’d visit when he was on leave from the US Army -Ft. Dix, New Jersey.

A sprinkle of cinnamon sugar on top, a pinch of nutmeg in the dough. A soft sugar cookie, moist from the addition of sour cream.
Here’s a photo from June 1974.
Paul and his daughter Amy at my wedding.

It’s hard to sum up a life in a few words. Paul was a blog follower and told me one time I was a little heavy on the photos showing decay. You know those abandoned buildings and discarded furniture pieces, the garbage I post? 😂 We’re going to miss his laughter, his kindness, his generous heart- full of love for all of us.

Here’s a link to his obituary in the Berkshire Edge.

Hymn of Promise Author: Natalie Sleeth (1986). pianist Evan Alperone sung by Tim Silva

Fellow Blogger’s Book is Here

I’ve followed Didi van Frits for years now. We even had the good fortune to be in Berlin visiting family at the same time and we got to meet in person. That’s was in June 2019. I dedicated a blog post to him in 2013

Berlin June 2019

He has just published his book and I ordered the English version and it has arrived from Germany.

Here’s the link for the details.

About

Here’s Didi van Frits Book

I’m 75 years old now. I’ve made a lot of music in my life since I was 12 when I started playing the banjo in a Dixieland orchestra. I studied theology, sociology, psychology, and finally philosophy. Of course, philosophy had the most lasting impact on me. But also painting, photography, caricatures (I love Sempe), and the weekly political debate or the science of history with its often frightening details. Where did I feel most comfortable? With the music.”
Videos at http://www.facebook.com/didi.vanfrits

You can hear my recording of him playing. Just a snippet of his playing guitar at his hotel courtyard when we met.

With his lovely wife Barbara in Berlin June 2019

https://youtube.com/shorts/3YjfQcxaWvs?feature=share

Be Kind and Sport a Cardigan November 13th

 

World Kindness Day is Wednesday November 13.

 Wear your cardigans for World Kindness Day  article in Tribune Review by Shirley McMarlin and remember Mr. Fred Rogers who exhibited acts of kindness as a way of life.  And wore cardigan sweaters on his television show.

Here’s what Mr. Rogers said about his mother making his sweaters.

“She makes sweaters for many different people,” he told the camera, after showing a picture of his mom and pointing out the intricate details in each piece. “But, that’s one of the ways that she has of saying that she loves somebody.”   from article by Samantha Sutton  In Style Magazine

One of Mr. Rogers’ sweaters at the Children’s Museum in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania

Maura poses with one of Mr Rogers’ sweaters At the Children’s Museum Pittsburgh

Watch Mr. Rogers suitcoat turn into a cardigan as I pour in the hot water from the kettle.

Knit for Laura with lots of love  in 1984 by my dear friend’s mother- Karlene

Cardigan-wikipedia The cardigan was named after James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan, a British Army Major General who led the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava during the Crimean War.[2] Thank you Mister Rogers:  Music and Memories new album just came out October 25th  click for more information  They arelaunching a campaign to declare November as “National Thank You, Mister Rogers Month.” Everyone is welcome to support the effort by going to www.thankyoumisterrogers.com for more info and to share their memories of Fred.

One of my photographs was selected to be used in promoting the album. 

 

On the Southside of Pittsburgh Fredasaurus previous blog post

Guitar Doc Berlin

Along the Spree River, in a building covered in vines, you can find Guitar Doc. Here’s Anthony working on his 100th guitar. His father being a handyman was always working with his hands so when Anthony was small, he’d look over his shoulder and watch and learn.

There’s a Vintage Guitar Lounge where you can take an instrument from the wall display and test it as you sit and play. Listen to the tone, feel the heft of the polished wood, strum and pick the strings.

A good day for an addition to the People at Work series.

 

 

Guitar Doc
https://www.guitardoc.de/ along the Spree River