You always ask if there is anything you can do…….

A good friend passed early Wednesday morning. You always ask if there is anything you can do…..

E64A6081-9C28-4E2F-ADC3-AE72009D3B33Cj and her daughter at Thanksgiving a few years ago.

She was a loving mother, a devoted sister,  an excellent teacher, a strong woman, a heartfelt writer and a steadfast partner.   An advocate for so many students in the Pittsburgh Public Schools. Inspiring thousands. A Madwoman writer at Carlow University. 

I  can picture her signing Go Tell it on the Mountain at a Christmas Choir Concert

Reading her poetry at Poe*Art, touching us with her words.

Playing music to motivate the scores of teachers who became students every summer in The Western Pennsylvania Writing Project at the University of Pittsburgh.

Another friend who taught with her for a couple of years remembers her playing Rocky’s Theme to get the students geared up for testing.  The same friend said Cj always made lemonade when life handed her lemons.  So true.

Here is another song she’d play for her students and sign with them.

 

The plea for help with medical expenses is now compounded by the additional need for Funeral/Memorial costs.  If you’ve ever received a bill in the mail after someone has passed you’ll understand why I am getting this request out to the world.  Cj was always supportive of my blog efforts and an avid follower.  

No amount too small to help the family through this difficult time  Click to donate

Thank you.   E64A6081-9C28-4E2F-ADC3-AE72009D3B33

 

A Happy Valentine from 2007, Found While Cleaning

This photo and note were sent to me in 2007 by my dear friend Dorothy Holley.

I found it today (Valentine’s Eve?) while cleaning a desk I rarely use. It was a lovely find as Dorothy passed in June 2010.

I included her note on the back, telling how she took it through a window and a screen.

Now and then I see one in my yard, too. Cardinals look stunning against the evergreen by my porch, especially in the snow. Dorothy loved the birds and waited to capture this picture.

She was a good encourager to me.

Placed her Valentine’s photo on red paper to take a shot with my phone to share with you.

If you’ve followed the blog, you’ve “met” Dorothy before.The Quart Jar Poet film is for sale as a fundraiser for Madwomen in the Attic, Carlow University.

https://rutheh.com/2010/06/08/dorothy-h-holley-poet-friend/

https://rutheh.com/2016/11/09/meet-the-man-who-made-copies-of-the-film-quart-jar-poet/

And here’s a poem by Liane Ellison Norman about Dorothy’s iris.

https://rutheh.com/2010/07/22/i-dug-up-the-iris-by-guest-poet-liane-ellison-norman/

By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them

First posted in February 2010 and again in 2013.  Thanks Timons Esaias Guest Poet

Sidewalk Shoveled

Tim’s Poem Came to Mind as I Admired the Concrete First Time in Two Weeks – Photographed Feb 2010

By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them

Originally there were eleven Commandments

Moses, perhaps confused by the unfamiliar

snow, ice, and sidewalk,

botched one, and left it out.

But Buddha said that though Life is Pain,

falling on ice is gratuitous pain

and those who cause it, by neglect,

should never escape the Wheel of Rebirth;

and Lao-Tzu agreed, for those who will not

clear the path will never find the Way.

Zoroaster, in the endless war of light

against ice, demanded diligence;

claimed that those who surrender

the public way to the Enemy

have empty souls,

can scarcely be regarded as human.

The Prophet, regarding sidewalks and snow,

is silent; but his sura

Sand Drifting Against the Caravanserai Gate

is thought to apply. The condemnation there

is brutal and eternal.

Plato counted safe sidewalks as fundamental

to the ideal Republic, noting that those remiss

in this clear duty lacked all character;

and his pupil – perceptive, immortal Aristotle-

further declared, famously, that

lack of character

is destiny.

-Timons Esaias
Timons Esaias is a writer and poet living in Pittsburgh. His short stories, ranging from literary to genre, have been published in fourteen languages. He has had over a hundred poems in print, including Spanish, Swedish and Chinese translations, in such markets as 5AM, Bathtub Gin, Main Street Rag, Willard & Maple, Elysian Fields Quarterly: The Literary Journal of Baseball and many others. He has also been a finalist for the British Science Fiction Award, and won the Asimov’s Readers Award. His poetry chapbook, The Influence of Pigeons on Architecture, sold out two editions. He is Adjunct Faculty at Seton Hill University, in the Writing Popular Fiction M.F.A. Program. This poem was originally published in hotmetalpoets.com when it existed.

This entry was posted on February 19, 2010. It was filed under poetry, Things in the Snow and was tagged with city scene, HIghland Park, photo of the day, photography, Pittsburgh, Poem, poet, poetry, shovel, sidewalk, snow, Timons Esaias, urban scene, winter scene.

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16 responses

Bill

Too deep for me.

February 19, 2010 at 7:07 am Edit

Reply

Toni Kichi

Makes me happy that our sidewalks are clear and clean – thanks to Mike!! I couldn’t handle all those punishments! Seems like an almost normal day today!! Thanks for starting it with something special!!! Did Bill mean the snow was too deep – or the poem??!! Either way, I agree! My mind is mush (like this snow will soon be) — been in the house too long!!!

February 19, 2010 at 8:42 am Edit

Reply

Dorothy

All tis is great Ruth. It is like your photos and words are a diary of living through these snowy days.

Dorothy

February 19, 2010 at 9:12 am Edit

Reply

erica

Too wonderful for … words?? 🙂 Changes my attitude on shoveling, altho I am already somewhat aware that I smile and feel satisfaction when I get to the concrete! A bit anxious now, tho, about the snow still on the bushes, bending branches low over the sidewalk leading to my caravanserai gate ……! 🙂

February 19, 2010 at 9:52 am Edit

Reply

Arlene Weiner

There is a special place in hell

where, frozen in ice, only his rear

exposed to Satan’s teeth, he’ll dwell

whose sidewalk’s untouched while his driveway’s clear.

February 19, 2010 at 10:50 am Edit

Reply

joseph k

that is one great photo

joseph

February 19, 2010 at 4:27 pm Edit

Reply

Bonnie Imhoff

I know the snow is a pain, but it is beautiful. I enjoy the pic very much.

POST NAVIGATION

7 THOUGHTS ON “BY THEIR SIDEWALKS YOU WILL KNOW THEM – GUEST POET TIMONS ESAIAS- ORIGINALLY POSTED 2-19-2010”

Listen to Garrison Keillor Read Liane Ellison Norman’s Poem Today

Saturday morning I went to a wonderful poetry reading at Calvary Episcopal Church on Shady Avenue (in Pittsburgh). It was a grand crowd of friends, fellow poets and family. Jan Beatty gave a marvelous introduction and then Liane read poems from her book.   They had to get extra chairs! Afterwards there was lots of hot coffee and croissants, raspberries and blueberries and other delicious pastries. Her grandson helped sell the books and make change.

Liane Ellison Norman’s new poetry book is Breathing the West: Great Basin Poems.

On Monday December 3rd, one of her poems will be read by Garrison Keillor on The Writer’s Almanac.  How cool is that?

Here’s the link so you can listen to the reading of Tree by Liane Ellison Norman.

Poet Liane Ellison Norman and her husband Bob
Poet Liane Ellison Norman and her husband Bob

 

Count the Pigeons on a City Rooftop

At first glance you think you are seeing architectural details, all along the roof ledge.  There were at least fifty of them.  Part of city life- the pigeon.  Today’s photo/post  evokes the poet Timons Esaias whose chapbook title is  The Influence of Pigeons on Architecture For a copy ($8.50) contact Tim via his website.

You may remember Timons Esaias was guest poet on the blog for his poem. By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them (click here) posted about this time last year.

Birds in the City

Not in a tree this time
or flying above.
People have feelings about them.

Carson Street on the South Side. A beautiful blue sky.

Dorothy H. Holley – Poet, Friend

A slideshow, remembering Dorothy. Blackberries on Greek yogurt.  Roses, iris and tulips from her garden. The back porch where we’d sit, have tea, watch birds feed and bathe.  She wrote poems after viewing the photos of the Mill at Night and The Cider Press.  She baked fresh bread and gave me some to take home for Steve. She’d slice tomatoes and make summer sandwiches to share. She contributed many comments on the blog. She showed us how to live life with courage, grace and love. for Pittsburgh Post Gazette obituary click here

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Service at Calvary Church Shady and Walnut, Friday June 11th 6:00PM

“By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them” Guest Poet Timons Esaias

Tim's Poem Came to Mind as I Admired the Concrete First Time in Two Weeks

*NOTE to poet(s)   not knowing HTML code I am restricted by the format of this blog template and or the limits of Text/Edit from word.doc to Mac? and the poem will not publish in the original format.   It is a five stanza poem and the breaks occur after   -out.   -Way.  -human. – eternal. Hence the hyphens for space and breath.

By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them

Originally there were eleven Commandments

Moses, perhaps confused by the unfamiliar

snow, ice, and sidewalk,

botched one, and left it out.

But Buddha said that though Life is Pain,

falling on ice is gratuitous pain

and those who cause it, by neglect,

should never escape the Wheel of Rebirth;

and Lao-Tzu agreed, for those who will not

clear the path will never find the Way.

Zoroaster, in the endless war of light

against ice, demanded diligence;

claimed that those who surrender

the public way to the Enemy

have empty souls,

can scarcely be regarded as human.

The Prophet, regarding sidewalks and snow,

is silent; but his sura

Sand Drifting Against the Caravanserai Gate

is thought to apply. The condemnation there

is brutal and eternal.

Plato counted safe sidewalks as fundamental

to the ideal Republic, noting that those remiss

in this clear duty lacked all character;

and his pupil – perceptive, immortal Aristotle-

further declared, famously, that

lack of character

is destiny.

Timons Esaias


Timons Esaias is a writer and poet living in Pittsburgh.  His short stories, ranging from literary to genre, have been published in fourteen languages.  He has had over a hundred poems in print, including Spanish, Swedish and Chinese translations, in such markets as 5AMBathtub GinMain Street RagWillard & MapleElysian Fields Quarterly: The Literary Journal of Baseball and many others.  He has also been a finalist for the British Science Fiction Award, and won the Asimov’s Readers Award.  His poetry chapbook, The Influence of Pigeons on Architecture, sold out two editions.  He is Adjunct Faculty at Seton Hill University, in the Writing Popular Fiction M.F.A. Program.  This poem was originally published in hotmetalpoets.com when it existed.

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