Sam Barsky and His Famous Landmark Sweaters Arrive in Oakmont

An April 2018 New York Times Article by Laura M Holson  It’s Sweater Weather Forever states:

Samuel Barsky has gained a measure of fame online for posting photographs of himself in front of famous landmarks with his handmade sweaters.”

Thursday afternoon, Yarns by Design, a local yarn store in Oakmont, Pennsylvania, hosted

Mr. Sam Barsky, a Baltimore native.

Traveling with him and on display were some his famous landmark sweaters.  You may have seen him on the internet, posing in front of famous landmarks, sporting the sweater he designed and knit of that very landmark.  He showed one sweater he knit with Ellis Island on one side and the Statue of Liberty on the other side.

He’s even knit a sweater for himself and a matching dress for his wife, too.  Click his name in the beginning of the above paragraph for link to see a photo.

The attentive audience got to ask Mr. Barsky questions after his presentation, showing his artistic hand knit sweaters which on average take him a month to complete. He said knitting has really helped him in his life and health.

After the photos were taken, he was teaching a two hour workshop on his technique.

Here are some photos of the event.

Natalie and Michelle of Yarns by Design with artistic knitter Sam Barsky and his sweaters

Posing with Sam (in his Pittsburgh sweater) and Deborah (his wife seated on left), with the audience modeling his colorful knitted sweaters

 

 

 

 

The famous HOLLYWOOD sign on the left and the Eclipse of the Sun on the right.

Thanks for inviting me, Natalie.  Got home just in time to have fun capturing Mr. Barsky and his colorful knitted sweaters.

 

Here’s Natalie Belmont with her latest knitting Work in Progress in hand. 

In Harmony, Pennsylvania

IMG_3363Harmony – the weekly photo challenge.

I thought a report from Harmony, PA would make an interesting and different post.

Always seeking fresh blog content.

I was already out in my car and drove along the Ohio River without the the GPS.  When I put Harmony PA into Maps App I was taken first to the street signs at the bottom of this post.  Harmony, Pennsylvania is about 30+ miles north of the city, Pittsburgh.

Unfortunately the Harmony Museum was closed for the day by the time I got to town so will find a willing friend and return. (Preferably on a Spring day with some blue sky.)

I read they have a German Christmas Market, too. Views of Main Street and

We will have lunch at the Stohr Haus Bakery .

Have to plan to arrive at the right time, next time.

Open       Wed-Fri  7-2          Saturday 8-2

IMG_2539

IMG_3392

Below -the Historical Marker for the Harmonist Cemetery.

“Graves were not marked”

IMG_3396

IMG_3393

Have you ever seen a cemetery without a single marker?

Link to information about the Harmony Society

IMG_3397

Steve and  I went to Harmony in March 2010 (blogpost at night)  for a poetry reading at the Bottlebrush Gallery   

Today I shopped in the gallery- bought tea towels and a baby quilt.

Because I took a circuitous route, avoiding the interstate and driving the secondary roads, my phone GPS took me to 3 Harmony signs near the town of Baden, PA.  Unintentional but interesting to find three Harmony signs.

Received a great response from Harmony Museum Thanks Ruth!! A great time to visit us next would be June 11th. It is our Herb & Garden Fair (at our Harmonist Barn), Fiber Festival in town, and Springfest in town. Lots going on! Free shuttle between the barn and town. Food, entertainment, artists, demonstrations, so much to photograph that day! Starts at 9 am and runs until 3 pm, though the shops are open later than that!

 

 

Dinner at The Olde Bar on Walnut Street

Our hotel, a short block away- The Olde Bar has been here a year- where the Philadelphia institution Bookbinders was for more than a century.

“Set in the Old Original Bookbinders, Jose Garces’ saloon offers seafood, a raw bar & retro drinks.”

I had the New England clam chowder, which was very good. And the Fish and Chips.  The chips cooked in beef fat. I asked why they were so tasty!

The shiny dark wooden bar was built in the late 1800’s and shipped in the forties from a Nevada ghost town, according to the bartender. Little candles flickering add ambiance.

Original floors, original leaded windows.

img_2336

You can see the raw bar with the oysters resting on crushed ice below