Paperweights Gallery from Blog Followers

Yesterday’s blog post Glass Paperweights received some terrific responses

Here are some of the paperweight photos I received today

      An example of Close Millefiori paperweight from our parents, sent by sister Mary

 

Souvenir Paperweight sent by my sister

Ken in California sent the dandelion paperweights photos.  See yesterday’s comments for a DIY  “Craft Klatch” video on youtube how to create your own dandelion paperweight (thanks Mary)

My friend Joanne in Florida sent the paperweight she bought in Mdina Malta c. 1971

 

My friend Ann in Colorado sent me these paperweight photos of her paperweights doubling as doorstoppers

And in case you missed it – click link of slideshow of 11 featured Paperweights of the World from the Corning Museum of Glass

Glass Paperweights

Do you have a paperweight, glass or other material, in your home? Do you use a paperweight?

I was on the phone with my sister and asking her if anyone still uses paperweights.  She told me I had the New York Historical Society book on glass paperweights in my house. She was right.  I found it easily on a bookshelf in the little used third floor. The author is Paul M. Hollister

“Author, lecturer, and painter Paul Hollister (1918-2004) was one of the foremost scholars of 17th to 19th century glass studies, glass paperweights, and contemporary studio art glass. Hollister’s interest in glass was sparked when, upon the death of his mother, he inherited 10 paperweights she had collected during her travels in Europe” – Corning Museum of Glass Website

I knew I had a paperweight in the dining room cabinet. It had belonged to my parents.

How they make glass paperweights is fascinating to me.  If you have any interest in how they are made, the history and popularity of paperweights, the various types, how to look for identifying markers, and other information about collecting them there is a wonderful article by Carleigh Queenth     Collecting Paperweights:7 things to know 

Millefiori or ‘thousand flowers’ canes are produced by layering molten glass into a pattern in a fat cylindrical shape, then pulling the cylinder to create an elongated pencil-thin rod. When the rod is sliced, the pattern can be seen in the cross section. “ -Carleigh Queenth (Head of Ceramics and Glass, Christie’s NY @breakingisbad on Instagram)

See the Paperweights of the World collection at the Corning Museum of Glass here 

Here is a paperweight from my parents.

 

 

The book my sister knew I had in my possession. She was correct

There is a second paperweight in my house that my sister bought for my son Matthew, a dandelion gone to seed, encased in a half globe of clear plastic.

Peter Rabbit and his Family

Peter Rabbit and his mother as she was returning from the market, and his sisters, Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail. They got to have blackberries for supper.

Peter Rabbit was given to me by my father sometime in the ’60s, the first of the collection.

 

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Week 10 – Put Your Collections on Display

Cee’s Photography Blog provides good information on the many and varied photo challenges that are out there in the blogging world. Cee inspires many with her beautiful photographs.  You might have read one of Cee’s encouraging comments and she always manages to click the like button. too.  She is one of the most prolific bloggers I follow.

Yes, I know I missed the first nine weeks of the Hunt for Joy Challenge but week ten collections jumped out at me.

I am all for hunting for joy, too.

Not a Beatrix Potter rabbit but she’s knitting!

Here are some of my rabbits and also some Beatrix Potter Figurines.  They’ve been with me for decades.  I don’t add to the collection.  They sit on a shelf of the lawyer’s bookcase with the glass front down but to take a quick photo of them tonight I lifted the glass.  Dusting them might have been a good idea.

Have a collection you want to display? Email me a photo and I will add it to the post.

I love to hear how your collection got started. How you curate it. Do friends add to your collections?

 

 

 

Still Life With Stuff in the House

My next door neighbor, who is an artist, suggested I put things together in my house, create a still life and photograph them.

I shot the flowers in the pottery vase the other day.

Here is today’s collection.

Throwback Thursday Home Decor

Ceramic figurines seem to speak of yesteryear to me. People might have them in their homes but I wonder how recently they were purchased. Do people still buy these and put them on display? Dust them? I am fascinated by what people collect. Especially when I’m trying to pare down and reduce my “stuff”.

I’ve posted about Hummels and Lladros before. You’ve seen my Royal Doulton Beatrix Potter figurines and ceramic rabbits who knit. Perhaps you’ve inherited a ceramic figurine from a relative who has passed. One thing I know is this-my own grown up children don’t want any of the porcelain or China things I have in my glass door cupboards.

One this large can’t be classified a tchotchke, can it? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tchotchke)

Urban dictionary says “look around your home and see what a robber probably would not steal.”

Liberty Avenue Window Display

What I found in my desk while digging for my birth certificate

I have an old drop leaf desk in my front hall.

It’s the repository of my important papers. And old birthday cards, ticket stubs, cancelled checks,  yellowed newspaper clippings and _

although I did NOT find what I needed, I found these old Garbage Pail Kids Trading Cards from the eighties.

“originally released in 1985 and designed to parody the Cabbage Patch Kids dolls, which were immensely popular at the time.” Wikipedia

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excerpt from Wikipedia- for more indepth information click here

“The series was the brainchild of Topps consultant and Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Art Spiegelman, ……..Spiegelman and fellow cartoonist Mark Newgarden worked together as the editors and art directors of the project, Len Brown was the manager, and the first run of the cards was drawn exclusively by artist John Pound” 

 

 

Lladros, Hummels-does anyone still collect these?

IMG_6692Lladros courtesy of E’s grandmother’s collection. My sister-in-law has a lot of these figurines, too. Maura (8) made the pink ceramic ballet skipper in Art.

Whenever we lived in Germany in the 80’s, people were collecting Hummels like crazy.

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Special curio cabinets were purchased to display them.  Some had glass shelves and lights.

Lladros courtesy of E’s grandmother’s collection. My sister-in-law has a lot of these figurines, too.

Hummels courtesy of R’s sister’s collection

Lightner Museum Houses Countless Collections

The title a bit misguided because of course  each and every collection is carefully cataloged and counted.

It was just that there were so many collections.

After going through the museum you felt as if you wanted to get home and start purging stuff.  Look around and eliminate the collections in your house.

 

Lightner Museum in St. Augustine Florida had that effect on my friend  Joanne  and me.

My favorite collection was the Leonard H. Baer  Toaster Collection.

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img_0523Their website lists the collections.

From typewriters to Tiffany,
Otto Lightner’s collection of fine
and decorative art from the 19th century
is impressive and extensive.

The Museum’s eclectic collection
ranges from a mummy, shrunken heads,
human hair art, cigar labels, buttons,
salt and pepper shakers, to Tiffany glass,
cut glass, porcelain, fine art paintings,
furniture and sculpture all housed
throughout the four floors of
the original Alcazar Hotel.

 

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Dressing Downton    Changing Fashion for Changing Times    October 4, 2017 – January 7, 2018 

 

Yes, that’s the cafe in the old swimming pool.

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