1984 Quilt Started With a National Geographic Map

We lived in Clarion PA in 1981 and I created this State Capitals Quilt for my 5 year old son Mark ( he’ll turn 43 next month). Bicentennial baby. My grandmother actually knit a red white and blue Afghan to match.  Anyway, Mark  learned all the capitals of the states at an early age thanks to my dad. It’s fun to hear a two year old say “Sacramento.”

I’ve seen the quilt in grandson Michael’s and also in Jack’s room but today it was hanging over the banister  here in Ohio so thought I’d post it.

I used a National Geographic map as the template for the states, machine  appliquéing them onto the squares in the order they entered the union. Delaware and Maryland  State the First square. I embroidered the capital on each. Texas and Alaska are on a different Scale so they’d fit onto the their square. I wish I knew how many miles to the inch  The last square I embroidered a bit of the Nation’s Capital.

Then my Aunt Rhea and my cousin Beth (both whom have passed)  took it to their church quilting group in Illinois and the group hand quilted it, completing in 1984. We were living in Germany that year. I can’t remember having it there but must have been reunited with it in 1986 when we moved stateside to Kentucky.

I’m always looking for signs

As I got into my car at The Lakes parking lot, I saw this card by my foot.

The late afternoon light made the pavement and painted line come alive.  The business card appeared to float.

Do I put the knitting down and begin to quilt?

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Thought I should identify whose card I found…

 

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Meet Malka- A Stitch in Dye

Austin, Texas is noted for live music and creative artists.

And stunning hand-dyed, uniquely-patterned fabrics, by Malka Dubrawsky. Touring her studio, I was reminded of my color theory class, studying Josef Albers.

In between wedding and celebrations, Colleen, who hails from Nova Scotia, made arrangements to meet Malka at her studio, A Stitch in Dye.

Colleen is an avid quilter and follows Malka’s blog.

The four of us piled in Joanne’s car and her son Chris, ferried us to A Stitch in Dye where Malka welcomed us and generously gave a tour of her studio.

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Malka Dubrawsky – Fiber Artist

26074255430_c07b8adf97_kMalka explained the dye process. We learned about the addition of soda ash.

Lengths of fabric soak in dye. Wax in electric frying pans for making the designs on the fabric

 

26321167766_3db3fc7cff_kWax design drying, ready for a dye bath

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Button jar

25741790244_61ef3cd42e_kJoanne spotted these gloves on a shelf.  Thanks J.

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Custom designs available and international shipping! Click for her Etsy Store to see samples of her vibrant hand dyed fabrics. She has written two books.

Color Your Cloth: A Quilter’s Guide to Dyeing and Patterning Fabric and Fresh Quilting: Fearless Color, Design, and Inspiration.

26347120015_67c1d4d60d_oLeft Handed Appliqué Scissors.

26321137986_7e4f2f7d75_kStacks of fabric to be sewn into quilt designs

26074218620_1663b13e6f_kThanks for a wonderful tour.  Malka saw us out to the parking lot.

Glad Colleen had such a cool connection in Austin.   The fabrics she bought were richly colored and fabulous designs. Can’t wait to see your quilt creation, Colleen. Send photos for upcoming blog post!

My Grandmother’s Quilt and About to Jump in Monday

Fray.  

A verb.  

A noun.

Hopefully not my nerves or the rope

I hang onto with my best grip.

I sleep with the comfort of the worn red calico and

yellowed muslin quilt my grandmother stitched decades ago.  

Mary Alta Kerr Hendricks born Feb 7, 1892 Farmersville, Illinois
Mary Alta Kerr Hendricks born Feb 7, 1892
Farmersville, Illinois   She’s the one who taught me to knit when I was four.

 

. I told my friend V what the photo challenge word of the week was and she said,

“Fray? That’s an easy one.  You start school Monday.”

The classroom is ready
The classroom is ready.  I’m jumping in. 

After a Day of Football Watching

My son-in-law James and Penny the Golden Doodle, exhausted!  James was happy with the results of two games (Ohio State and Auburn winning)  and said he didn’t care much about the last one- USC and UCLA.  He gave me permission to blog the two of them resting on the couch.  Laura had already headed to bed.

I went down the street to photograph a crazy Christmasy house lit up full force but they’d flipped the  off switch early and gone to bed. Thought that would have been good for the Let There Be Light challenge part two.

The pink afghan covering James has a label in it from my father’s mother Mary Alta Hendricks, who knit it in 1976 at age 84.

Born in 1892.  That was a long time ago.

I’d been knitting all evening while the games were on. Earlier in the day,  my granddaughter Anna and my daughter Laura had been knitting as we all sat on the same couch.  Passed down four generations. There’s another afghan my grandmother knit from Bobbie, she sent it to Laura and James.

Tonight I am in the guest room at Laura and James’ sleeping under a quilt my grandmother stitched.

Thinking of family as the holiday weekend comes to a close.  Grateful for all the love passed down.

Thinking of those nearby and those no longer with us on earth, just in our hearts.

Penny and James

James and Penny are exhausted

QuiltQuilt stitched by my grandmother Mary Alta Hendricks