"Place, with a trace of humanity" Photography/Photo of the Day/Pittsburgh

Posts tagged “cooking

Notice -“Booming Stats” on Abandoned Blog Today

Five years ago I tried to create a recipe blog from my grandmother’s wooden recipe box and my mother’s recipe cards. I’d forgotten all about it until today when I got a notice from WordPress. Try this link to the blog   A friend wrote she had trouble

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Throwback Recipes Blog

I didn’t stick with this blog for very long.

There were SIX followers. Throwback seemed as if the recipes weren’t really relevant nowadays.

It stopped seeming like such a cool idea.

But today I got a notice “Your stats are BOOMING!”  On the Throwback Recipes blog.  Rhubarb Cake recipe and the home page

And 65 hits (that’s booming after zero) are from El Salvador, 2 are from United States and 1 from Australia. And in just ONE hour.

So thought I would share about my abandoned blog that got rediscovered today.

Did you ever start a blog and abandon it?

It’s always nice to receive those notices from WordPress.

Here is the Chocolate Pound Cake recipe my mother made

 

 

 

 


Another milestone-2500th post today 

Lots of double zeroes and double letter o on this 2500th blog post. Thanks for looking. 

Potholder loops -in the details

On the loom and off 

Laura’s wreath prompted inquiry- what exactly are potholder loops?

 Take a hot pot lid off without burning your hand. Good deal! Keep cool.


Stretch the cotton loop snd attach to the teeth of the metal loom.Create a pattern or random colored loops.

(you can get wool or nylon loops, too, the nylon material not so effective on hot pots! 


Today Laura made this potholder by carefully planning the order of the loops 

Reminiscent of watermelon by Laurs Use pencils or knitting needles to catch all the loops, remove from the loom and bind off 

Here was Laura’s wreath in case you missed it 


Zucchini, Garlic, Olive Oil

All come together in this recipe-

I love zucchini but this recipe is my favorite. It’s  from my next door neighbor in Clarion PA. (C.1980)

Nell Miller called them Poor Man Meatballs. 

The key to success is getting as much moisture out as you can -which is a challenge. And I like using the cast iron skillet. 

You grate or process about three (not the large seedy kind) zucchini

Tilt the bowl for a time to capture the wet. Drain off. Squeeze as dry as you can.

Add egg, dried Italian bread crumbs or plain with your own seasoning, salt and pepper. Toss with fork -add minced garlic. Mmmmmm can smell them now.  Shape like potato pancakes not too big. My gluten-free friend used crushed Rice Chex instead of bread crumbs.  Drain on paper towel.

You can eat them plain (my choice) or add to marinara sauce over pasta.


Julia Child’s Kitchen Via My Neighbor 

Julia Child’s Kitchen in the National Museum of American History, Washington DC as seen and photographed by my neighbor Joaquin. 

When he said he’d be in DC at the Smithsonian museum, I asked if he went to see Julia Child’s Kitchen, would he please send me pics-and he did. 

 I used to watch the cooking shows which were filmed in her Cambridge, Massachusetts kitchen. 

Seeing her actual kitchen in the museum is on my list of things to do!

Just the other day, my friend Roberta and I were sitting on the front porch, perusing a couple of Julia Child cookbooks. We read some fun passages, talked about cooking some of her menus and enjoyed thinking about her. I’ve had apple tart on my mind. 


And one of the books we were reading 
Click link to Watch staff move 1200 items for move and renovation of her kitchen and read ten facts about it! 

Here’s what we missed –

“If you are planning to check out the National Museum of American History’s Julia Child birthday extravaganza tomorrow, be there at 1 p.m. for a special surprise involving 50 pounds of butter, Julia’s favorite ingredient.”

•And another article about five things to learn from Julia Child’s Kitchen It’s okay not to be a minimalist!

•Information on Julia Child bio

•And Julia Child’s Recipe for a Thoroughly Modern Marriage by Ruth Reichl about Julia Child’s  impact on food and how we cook and eat Smithsonian Magazine article

Thanks for the photographs, Joaquin.


Seasons: Weekly Photo Challenge

Seasons Weekly photo challenge

Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall you need these 

  

Thank you, Bryant Street Market

I was picking up bread, coffee and milk and saw this rack and seasons came to mind. Adding some flavor to life!


Zucchini Three Ways

Arrived in Ohio this afternoon. 

Vegetable soup. 

Poor man meatballs (no meat)

And grated carrot,zucchini, with garlic sautéed in olive oil. Salt and pepper
  


Comfort Sought in a Food Item May be Unhealthy-

-but sometimes necessary. Started to make a long list of all the reasons leading to this desire and changed my mind.

You fill in the blank _______________________________________________

I’d been thinking about a grilled cheese sandwich for weeks.

grilled cheese sandwich

grilled cheese on a plate


A Knitting Themed Tea Cozy and San Pasqual Patron Saint of Cooks

Returned to Pittsburgh this evening and a package of Christmas gifts from J in Omaha, awaited me.

She stitched a bright colored tea cozy to keep the tea warm as it steeps.

Love the colors and knitting theme as many of you know I’ve been knitting my way through the winter.

I need a patron saint in the kitchen and will put him in a prominent place in the morning.

Thanks J. What a fun surprise.

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Here is granddaughter Anna sporting one of the cowls I knit everyone
for Christmas

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Warmth

Warmth is what we seek this time of year.


I find it hard to clean out the basement

My friend Ann has no trouble throwing things out.

These items, ignored for such a long time, need to be thrown out.

Reading this post might be like my neighbor says- “Watching paint dry.”

Slated to get a much needed new furnace installed and an updated electrical box-

so the pressure’s on to clear the place.

Buying new lights to illuminate the boxes of junk was a start.

My problem is I think about all the different lives the things represent.  Matthew suggested photographing the junk.

I was able to get another one of those construction bags filled to go out to the curb. Two bags of items for donation

But a dusty electric skillet lined with probable-poison-coating when heated, no lid or plug? Immediate disposal.

No problem!

electric fry pan

plastic groceries

Remaining plastic groceries from the little yellow shopping cart with the orange wheels, a tea party cup from at least 30 years ago.  Half a wooden lemon, a fake muffin.  Garbage.

Christmas decoration

A little felt elf, found in a Christmas tin. My mother used to put these on our stairs, wrapped them around the banister.

Probably purchased at a Church Bazaar in the 60’s.  He was looking at me.  Couldn’t throw him out. His sequined eyes looked at me.   Better than that Elf on the Shelf.

basket and badminton

A ratty basket in the shape of a duck and old badminton racquets.  Easy to pitch these.

cigar box with parts

Will I ever need these parts in this old cigar box?

science fair trophy 1988

Mark’s old trophy.   Erika saw this on FB when I posted and said it was a great item to stay in Pittsburgh!

I don’t even have a record player anymore

I don’t even remember who gave this to me

Can't remember who gave this to me

And then I found my dad’s old trench coat, black gloves in his pocket.

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I washed it, hung it out.  It had a presence as it hung on that hanger

Going to donate.    Steve said he’d wear it.  Made me feel a little less sad but I think it is too big on him.

Steve in my dad's coat

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Laura rhymes.  Yellowed paper booklet . Yucky.

Old workboots.  Owner unknown.

Work Boots


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