Month of May Stitched in Memory- Guest Blog

These photos are from May 1987, taken in Kentucky.  Sent by my good friend Joanne. We were so much younger then, we’re older than that now……

And a tribute to Phyllis George who passed May 14th.

Joanne, Phyllis, Ruth

Ruth – you and I reconnected as Army wives in Fort Knox, KY in 1986 after we both moved there from Germany, where we first met.  You taught me the art of smocking and we spent a lot of time together stitching beautiful outfits for our little girls.  Then we decided to make it a “cottage industry” and created our business Handsmocked in Kentucky.  We took special orders and sold our work in the  Kentucky Arts Council In Louisville … where we attracted the attention of Phyllis George (then wife of the Governor of Kentucky!) .

We had such fun and dreams with our little business, and then all of a sudden we were invited to Phyllis George’s home as a vendor for her Kentucky Derby celebration which featured Kentucky based artists!  What an adventure ….
33 years later I still have a lot of memories and a wardrobe of smocked dresses to hand down to some special little girl.  
My memory of Phyllis George was a gracious, giving woman who cared deeply about Kentucky artisans.   (And she wrote us a check for a handsmocked dress for her daughter.)

Joanne was able to go into her boxes of photos which are all labeled and put her hands on these photos.

Joanne even put her hands on our little brochure.  Her sister did the artwork.

Our daughters Laura and Anna at a tea party, sporting our smocking. This photo is in Germany where both girls were born.

Colleen’s Day in Nova Scotia -Guest Blog

Colleen sent a few photos of what she is doing at her home in Nova Scotia. Our friend Joanne in Florida thought it would be interesting to see what people are doing as they  “shelter in place.”  if you’ve followed this blog for six years you might remember Colleen’s cookbook collection post.  Thanks Colleen what a colorful and beautiful quilt.

What are you doing today?  Send photos.

 

Colleen and Her Love of Colorful Quilting

This is a collaborative guest post by two wonderfully creative women who have been friends since forever.

Colleen and Joanne hail from Nova Scotia.  Joanne, living in Florida, collected the photos and good information about Colleen and her love of colorful quilting.

Get to know Colleen and her colorful quilts-

 

Colleen says “I have a huge stash of fabric that I like to look at for inspiration.  Some I have had for many years and almost everything was purchased in the US.  I order online occasionally but it gets expensive with taxes, customs and shipping and delivery to Canada can take a long time – so much for instant gratification!  Currently Florida is my “go to” shopping locale because I’m there at least once a year.  Found a great quilt shop in St. Augustinehttp://www.beesquiltshop.com 

Here is Colleen, looking to the sun.

Colleen’s cookbook shelves were featured on the blog about five years ago

1984 Quilt Started With a National Geographic Map

We lived in Clarion PA in 1981 and I created this State Capitals Quilt for my 5 year old son Mark ( he’ll turn 43 next month). Bicentennial baby. My grandmother actually knit a red white and blue Afghan to match.  Anyway, Mark  learned all the capitals of the states at an early age thanks to my dad. It’s fun to hear a two year old say “Sacramento.”

I’ve seen the quilt in grandson Michael’s and also in Jack’s room but today it was hanging over the banister  here in Ohio so thought I’d post it.

I used a National Geographic map as the template for the states, machine  appliquéing them onto the squares in the order they entered the union. Delaware and Maryland  State the First square. I embroidered the capital on each. Texas and Alaska are on a different Scale so they’d fit onto the their square. I wish I knew how many miles to the inch  The last square I embroidered a bit of the Nation’s Capital.

Then my Aunt Rhea and my cousin Beth (both whom have passed)  took it to their church quilting group in Illinois and the group hand quilted it, completing in 1984. We were living in Germany that year. I can’t remember having it there but must have been reunited with it in 1986 when we moved stateside to Kentucky.

I Learned to Sew in the ‘60s with Simplicity Patterns

Saw this Simplicity Patterns display at the local JoAnn store.

Immediate recognition of “the look” and then some nostalgia surfaces.

I took Home Economics at Morris Plains Borough School in the mid 60’s.

Mrs. Phelan was our teacher.
I remember one project being given a B instead of an A because I didn’t take care of all the loose ends of thread inside my blue and red polka dot dress.

Mortifying. I think of her when I weave in loose ends of yarn or tie knots in threads and trim them oh, so neatly.

We made an apron, a skirt, a blouse, shorts, a dress and the other half year we cooked and baked. I graduated to Vogue Patterns eventually but I think all of my early basic efforts were Simplicity.

Quilts of Valor and Upstate New York Weekend Guest Blog

Pittsburgh Poet Fred Peterson is the guest blogger today.  Fred posted the quilt photos on FB and said he thought he knew I would like them and I did!  Thanks for sharing your photos, Fred.  

 

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Quilt of Valor presentation of military family (Navy father and two Air Force sons) in Horseheads NY.

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Quilt window and television display windows on Market Street, Corning, NY.

 

 

 

 

The scenics of tree, flowers and barn were taken on ride down western side of Seneca Lake.

 

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The bullseye is Corning Glass logo.

Little Knit Cactus

When you get a request from your granddaughter for a knitted item, you try to oblige. Within reason of course. -I’m thinking “a hat, mittens, a scarf……”

“Could you make me a knitted cactus?” Anna asked.

Huh?

I didn’t know there was such a thing. Thanks to Pinterest spreading the word, succulents, knitted, crocheted and stitched are a trend.

Mine looks different from the pattern by Lucille Randall. (which is free on Ravelry)

Might need more stuffing.  Also I need my friend Donna or FF Marlene to help crochet a better flower.  I followed the directions but it seems knitting is my stronger skill for sure.

When I started.  I used DPNs size one.  When I was telling my knitting friend, I had a flashback to a knit cactus I saw a couple of years ago at Hill Country Weavers in Austin, Texas. We were in line to check out and there it sat. Never thought another thing about it until now and I’d taken a quick phone photo.

Thanks for the Dream in Color Handpainted yarn, Molly. AND for finding that skein of Kidsilk Haze in the Jelly color.  Unbelievable.

Mend

Mend.

No, it’s not the word of the week.  And I haven’t done much mending lately.

It’s just that Mark asked if I could mend/repair his beloved Dude Cowichan Sweater. Both elbows were worn. I brought it home with me from Ohio.

There’s an incredible sense of satisfaction in having accomplished this task.

I got some yarn and mended the holes first, and then I ordered elbow patches and stitched them on using a blanket stitch.  The tiny perforations weren’t  easy to get the needle through and I wish I had my mother’s thimble.  It’s in my house but I didn’t look too deeply.

Mark’s sweater looks brand new.

No, I didn’t knit it. I mended it.

Just repaired the holes in the elbows and added the patches.

Scroll down to listen to Al Green sing-

and thanks to dictionary.com

Mend- to make (something broken, worn, torn, or otherwise damaged) whole, sound, or usable by repairing: to mend old clothes; to mend a broken toy. 2. to remove or correct defects or errors in.

And Al Green sings How Can You Mend a Broken Heart ?
Did people really reserve a whole day to mend?
Early Thursday morning was the day reserved for mending according to the nursery song Here We Go ‘Round the Mulberry Bush