McWalker Yarns Hosted a Poetry Reading in Millvale

Thursday evening in Millvale, Amy McCall, owner of McWalker Yarns hosted poets Sheryl St. Germain and her former MFA student at Chatham U, Michael Bennett.

The yarn store was a wonderful backdrop for Sheryl St. Germain’s reading. Surrounded by skeins and skeins of colorful yarn, Sheryl read her powerful essay (from Stitching Resistance:  Women, Creativity and Fiber Arts  edited by Marjorie Agosin). She told of the role crochet has played in her life since childhood, but focusing on how crocheting with yarn helped her cope while parenting a son who was in trouble with alcohol, drugs and the law. She also read poems about her son’s dying of a heroin overdose from her book The Small Door of Your Death.  Her words touched the audience as she described the helplessness and grief, her numbness, as she centered herself every evening after a long day- crocheting an afghan for her son.  The repetition of hook into yarn loops as a meditation, an ease from depression and the stress of hopelessness. A healing.

 

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Pittsburgh native Michael Bennett read his poetry first and opened for Ms. St. Germain.  Michael  has worked for three years with Words Without Walls program, teaching incarcerated Juvenile offenders, teenagers being tried as adults.


Cellist David Bennett and McWalker Yarns supporter introduces the poet and provided delicious desserts  by Millvale Baker Jean-Marc Chatelier


New Orleans native Sheryl St. Germain has published six poetry books, two collections of essays, and co-edited two anthologies. The Small Door of Your Death, a collection of poems about the death of her son from a heroin overdose, appeared in 2018 with Autumn House Press. A forthcoming book, Fifty Miles, is a collection of essays about healing that include a couple of essays about working with yarn. Sheryl directs the MFA program in Creative Writing at Chatham University where she also teaches poetry and creative nonfiction, and is co-founder of the Words Without Walls Program . She was named Louisiana Writer of the year in 2018. Sheryl is an avid and accomplished crocheter, and a much less accomplished knitter. See: www.sheryl-stgermain.com/ for more information.

 

Desserts  created  by  Jean-Marc Chatellier French Bakery

“What Does Silence Look Like?”

“What does Silence look like?” asks Cheri Lucas Rowlands who created this week’s photo challenge- Silence

This photo taken in Istria, Croatia in 2008.

A church sign.   Blog followers may have seen it posted in 2012 and remember. It seemed perfect for the challenge.

Silentium_ Sign_Croatia

and on the home front (well, Laura and James’ home)  Anna and Penny taking a nap before swim practice.

The wooly Afghan knitted by my paternal grandmother  Mary Alta Kerr Hendricks b. 2/7/1892

Weekly Photo Challenge: intricate

Intricate.   Complicated or detailed.  

 

 

Photographed by iPhone specifically for the challenge

Weekly Photo Challenge: Warmth

Warmth is what we seek this time of year.

After a Day of Football Watching

My son-in-law James and Penny the Golden Doodle, exhausted!  James was happy with the results of two games (Ohio State and Auburn winning)  and said he didn’t care much about the last one- USC and UCLA.  He gave me permission to blog the two of them resting on the couch.  Laura had already headed to bed.

I went down the street to photograph a crazy Christmasy house lit up full force but they’d flipped the  off switch early and gone to bed. Thought that would have been good for the Let There Be Light challenge part two.

The pink afghan covering James has a label in it from my father’s mother Mary Alta Hendricks, who knit it in 1976 at age 84.

Born in 1892.  That was a long time ago.

I’d been knitting all evening while the games were on. Earlier in the day,  my granddaughter Anna and my daughter Laura had been knitting as we all sat on the same couch.  Passed down four generations. There’s another afghan my grandmother knit from Bobbie, she sent it to Laura and James.

Tonight I am in the guest room at Laura and James’ sleeping under a quilt my grandmother stitched.

Thinking of family as the holiday weekend comes to a close.  Grateful for all the love passed down.

Thinking of those nearby and those no longer with us on earth, just in our hearts.

Penny and James

James and Penny are exhausted

QuiltQuilt stitched by my grandmother Mary Alta Hendricks

Mona Lisa, Jesus, Everything Must Go – City Street Views

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mona Lisa Bowl

 

Lawrenceville Sidewalk

 

jesus

 

 

Point Breeze Corner

 

 

couch and trash

 

Braddock Ave Near Penn Ave

 

 

 

Everything must go

Just last year they had new Fall arrivals- see post

 

 

 

drummersDrummers on the corner of 40th Street

 

 

afghan cover

 

None of these are stellar shots, but the collection of random sampling – what I see when I drive around the different parts of the city, makes for an interesting hodge podge.

What do you see where you live that catches your eye today?

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Pattern

Pattern.  This week I actually took a few photos to respond to the weekly challenge instead of sifting through the archives.

It was a wonderful Mother’s Day with an unexpected trip to meet the family at The Wilds in Cumberland OH but stay tuned for that post.   No time for uploading tonight.  Using the iPhone camera tonight, looking around the kitchen for patterns.  Came upstairs and saw the afghan on the bed.  Impromptu pattern photos.

Traffic pattern-  coming back from The Wilds we were totally stopped on Interstate 70 around Zanesville.

Traffic Pattern

 

 

China pattern.   I used to like the idea of mismatched china.  Service for 12 in twelve different patterns.  It was an idea.

China patterns

Silver Pattern.  My grandmother’s Moonglow and some random pattern in my drawer.  Used to be you would select a silver pattern when you were getting married.  Lots of couples choose stainless these days.

Silver Pattern

 

 

Knitting, Sewing and Smocking Patterns from yesteryear-  another life.  I used to do all these things when the kids were small.  I still knit.

 

 

Knitting Smocking and Sewing Patterns
Knitting Smocking and Sewing Patterns

 

 

Pattern in Nature

apple Star

 

 

A Chevron pattern– the crocheted afghan that a coworker’s mother made for my mother.  I call it the Good and Plenty afghan.

 

Chevron Pattern

 

 

Pattern in the lid of the jam, sitting on the kitchen table

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You can see some wonderful pattern in fellow blogger’s posts for the challenge this week

Waterlilies and driftwood 

Light through Glass Block Windows

Roofs in the Netherlands

Carpets Architecture Leaves and Details

Patterns in Lisbon

Patterns in Nature

The patterns of Wat Sene

Beach Patterns

and see Rockaway Six Months After Sandy at Nylondaze