Tundra Wilderness Tour in Denali National Park

This is the way the day started out when we left the hotel at 8 AM.  Our competent guide, Cassie, told us that only 30% of park visitors actually see the mountain. and even then it is usually bits and pieces of it.  She drove us 62 miles into the park and then the 62 miles back, about 8 hours round trip.  There were stops for the facilities and a box of snacks and we had ordered a box lunch, too.  There is not even a water fountain once you are in the park.

This is what it looked like in the morning.  43 degrees

img_1348we were driving through clouds in the Denali National Park and Preserve

But looked what happened as the day unfolded

We got to see a clear view of “The Great One” which is what Denali means to the Athabaskans.

img_1506It was a great birthday for Mary as the gift was we got to see the mountain.

We saw some wildlife- two grizzly bears, Dall Sheep, two caribou and two moose.

 

There aren’t guard rails along the route and the road turns from paved to gravel/dirt and gets narrower

img_1436Another tour bus

 

img_1445Don’t look down is my best suggestion!

 

img_1670

 

img_8450img_8452

 

img_8484

Fellow tourists try on antlers for photo ops.

This is the stop where Alaska Geographic was selling gorgeous books in a big tent.

img_8460Another view of Denali

This post is just the highlights of our tour today.

 

 

 

 

 

Chainsaw Artist Transforms Trees into Art

Bridgeport, Washington is a small town on the Columbia River, near  Chief Joseph Dam.  The town’s old sycamore trees, which lined the main street, were in sad shape but instead of being cut down, chainsaw artist Jacob Lucas has transformed them into incredible sculptures.

With a CHAINSAW!

(And by the way he does custom orders if you have a tree stump in need of being transformed.)

Salmon, quail, wolves, cougars, bear, the logging industry, deer, farming, pelicans, beavers, dragonfly, bees and honeycomb, eagles and other native species are a few of the themes of the tree sculptures.

See an owl swoop down to catch  jackrabbit below.

IMG_2825

IMG_2750

IMG_2729

To get an idea of the scaleIMG_2712

IMG_2761

IMG_2703

 

IMG_2688

 

IMG_2805

IMG_2707

 

IMG_2723

 

 

IMG_2709IMG_2778

IMG_2799

IMG_2745

A Bear and My Brother in Hank’s Market, Twisp WA

Went back to my Okanogan album of 2007 and found this photo of my brother shopping in Hank’s Market in Twisp WA.  How about that wildlife?

Happy Flag Day Birthday David.

xxoo love from your sister Ruth

Hank's Market in Twisp WA

Anyone Else Feel the Urge to Hibernate?

We are fast approaching the shortest day of the year.

Can’t wait it out in a cave, buy have you a special spot where you burrow in for the winter months?Bear Columbus Zoo

Furry slippers, cups of tea. Extra blankets to add some weight and warmth to the bed.  Flannel sheets.

When I’m knitting in the evenings, I have a shawl draped around my shoulders to ward off the chill.

Just something I’m thinking about tonight, the urge to hibernate.

Silvery-Cheeked Hornbills, Cheetah and Camel Rides at the Columbus Zoo

The new Heart of Africa  region (43 Acres) is open at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

I have mixed feelings about zoos but know that they do important animal conservation work and support programs around the world that assist in this effort. The weather was cool for a July day so we kept taking our jackets and sweaters on and off.

I can tell you that  the grandkids LOVE going to the zoo to see the animals.

There is always something interesting to learn and experience.  A first for the kids was the camel ride.
Six camels are rotated to give the rides.

Aunt Lala was remembering a lengthy camel ride she had in Egypt that she didn’t really enjoy but everyone had fun on Monday.

Yes, it was a bumpy ride.