Doll Hair Gone Wild

I heard from a friend a couple of weeks ago that her daughter’s doll was having some wild hair and could I possibly knit a doll hat?  Of course. They came to the front porch, masked,  the other morning and brought the dolls so I got to take a before and after photo.  We even had an impromptu knitting lesson with some worsted and those kid needles, where one needle is red and one blue.  I am sure a followup lesson in is our future.

Our favorite hairstylist Lauren suggested a good Dawn Liquid shampoo and a drop of conditioner MIGHT help revive the doll hair.

 

Vintage Cat Postcards

Alfred Mainzer was the postcard publisher not the artist, according to this informative article in the Mousebreath Magazine The artist was Eugen Hartung from Switzerland. I have some unused postcards and I see that they sell on Etsy for up to $15 for a single card.  I also have some written on by my father who was a definite fan of these cat cards.  I know he used to buy them in the ’50s  from a card shop in Montclair New Jersey run by Mr. Bert DeCamp.

The artist signed his initials in the corner in a heart which I never noticed before but I read that on Mousebreath   

The Hartung postcards were first published in Switzerland by Max Kunzli of Zurich and then(from the 1940’s onwards) by the Alfred Mainzer Company of Long Island New York.  Each card is signed with the artist’s monogram, a little heart in the lower right corner. (Because of cropping, sometimes the heart gets chopped off.)

Some are printed in Turkey and some printed in Spain.

LOOK WHO IS KNITTING A SOCK (using double point needles)

anthropomorphic cats

A cat is afraid of a runaway mouse?Fabric background by Firecracker  Fabrics.

Month of May Stitched in Memory- Guest Blog

These photos are from May 1987, taken in Kentucky.  Sent by my good friend Joanne. We were so much younger then, we’re older than that now……

And a tribute to Phyllis George who passed May 14th.

Joanne, Phyllis, Ruth

Ruth – you and I reconnected as Army wives in Fort Knox, KY in 1986 after we both moved there from Germany, where we first met.  You taught me the art of smocking and we spent a lot of time together stitching beautiful outfits for our little girls.  Then we decided to make it a “cottage industry” and created our business Handsmocked in Kentucky.  We took special orders and sold our work in the  Kentucky Arts Council In Louisville … where we attracted the attention of Phyllis George (then wife of the Governor of Kentucky!) .

We had such fun and dreams with our little business, and then all of a sudden we were invited to Phyllis George’s home as a vendor for her Kentucky Derby celebration which featured Kentucky based artists!  What an adventure ….
33 years later I still have a lot of memories and a wardrobe of smocked dresses to hand down to some special little girl.  
My memory of Phyllis George was a gracious, giving woman who cared deeply about Kentucky artisans.   (And she wrote us a check for a handsmocked dress for her daughter.)

Joanne was able to go into her boxes of photos which are all labeled and put her hands on these photos.

Joanne even put her hands on our little brochure.  Her sister did the artwork.

Our daughters Laura and Anna at a tea party, sporting our smocking. This photo is in Germany where both girls were born.

Playing UNO Together 200 Miles Apart

All you need is an UNO deck apiece.

And you FaceTime, making sure your discard pile can be seen.

It took a few reminders for me from Laura as to whose turn it was, especially when we reversed.

Here’s Lauras selfie from their end in Ohio.

 

Substitutes for Conversation Hearts

 

The iconic Necco conversation hearts are no longer made.😢

My sister sent out the Brach’s version to the grandkids.  I tasted one and spit it out in the trash but I will say she warned me prior to my putting it in my mouth.

Missing the chalky taste and flavors of the original.

 

But they looked festive so I photographed them along with the cinnamon hearts she mailed.

Happy Valentine’s Day

.

 

Jigsaw Puzzle Season

Jigsaw puzzles anyone? Yes or no?

if yes, what’s your method? Borders first? Similar colors? Solitary or communal effort?

Preferred number of pieces? Subject?

Anyone do a puzzle without looking at or knowing what the picture is?

In the mid 70’s I had a circular puzzle of a pizza with toppings.   I glued it together and tacked it on the kitchen door when we lived in Ft. Knox Kentucky.  Wish I had a photo of my colorful interior decoration in government quarters.
I’ve had a couple of puzzles made from my photographs and given them as gifts.

Relaxing activity? Stress reliever? Here’s the HIstory if you’re interested.

Laura working on a Star Wars puzzle- one of four.completed puzzle 12/17/19