Pepper, Penny and Charlie at the Farm on a Snowy Sunday

Saturday night after the anniversary party, we spent the night at the farm in Crestline. There was blowing snow, drifting across the roads. The roads too bad to drive back to the city in the dark.

Sunday morning we had a nice breakfast and watched Chuck blow and plow the quarter mile drive to the main road. Charlie has fun watching and the dogs were in and out.

Then Charlie bundled up and went outside-tried his hand at shoveling-  but not for long.

It was too cold.

 My camera lens fogged up with condensation from the temperature change, outdoors to indoors. 

“By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them” Guest Poet Timons Esaias

Tim's Poem Came to Mind as I Admired the Concrete First Time in Two Weeks

*NOTE to poet(s)   not knowing HTML code I am restricted by the format of this blog template and or the limits of Text/Edit from word.doc to Mac? and the poem will not publish in the original format.   It is a five stanza poem and the breaks occur after   -out.   -Way.  -human. – eternal. Hence the hyphens for space and breath.

By Their Sidewalks You Will Know Them

Originally there were eleven Commandments

Moses, perhaps confused by the unfamiliar

snow, ice, and sidewalk,

botched one, and left it out.

But Buddha said that though Life is Pain,

falling on ice is gratuitous pain

and those who cause it, by neglect,

should never escape the Wheel of Rebirth;

and Lao-Tzu agreed, for those who will not

clear the path will never find the Way.

Zoroaster, in the endless war of light

against ice, demanded diligence;

claimed that those who surrender

the public way to the Enemy

have empty souls,

can scarcely be regarded as human.

The Prophet, regarding sidewalks and snow,

is silent; but his sura

Sand Drifting Against the Caravanserai Gate

is thought to apply. The condemnation there

is brutal and eternal.

Plato counted safe sidewalks as fundamental

to the ideal Republic, noting that those remiss

in this clear duty lacked all character;

and his pupil – perceptive, immortal Aristotle-

further declared, famously, that

lack of character

is destiny.

Timons Esaias


Timons Esaias is a writer and poet living in Pittsburgh.  His short stories, ranging from literary to genre, have been published in fourteen languages.  He has had over a hundred poems in print, including Spanish, Swedish and Chinese translations, in such markets as 5AMBathtub GinMain Street RagWillard & MapleElysian Fields Quarterly: The Literary Journal of Baseball and many others.  He has also been a finalist for the British Science Fiction Award, and won the Asimov’s Readers Award.  His poetry chapbook, The Influence of Pigeons on Architecture, sold out two editions.  He is Adjunct Faculty at Seton Hill University, in the Writing Popular Fiction M.F.A. Program.  This poem was originally published in hotmetalpoets.com when it existed.