Peruvian Folk Art on Walnut Street

These bright colors caught my eye as I walked by the storefront of La Feria on Walnut Street.

It’s a restaurant too.

Shot horizontally. Fingers crossed it doesn’t somersault.

A Tea Wallet

One birthday, my friend Donna mailed me a teabag in a little fabric envelope. Here’s how I learned about another Tea Wallet.

Last week at the NY Public Library, my sister found a murder mystery with knitting on the cover and thought of me. (Yarned and Dangerous by Sadie Hartwell) see cover image below

In the back of the book she said there was a knitting pattern for a Tea Wallet.  I found another Tea Wallet pattern for one by Diane Trap on Ravelry. I knit one for my friend Vincie because I knew she carries her own tea bags in her purse. In a little plastic baggie. Not any more!

I made a modification on the front flap and made it a triangle shape, decreasing at each side.

The quilted knitting motion bag serving as a pretty backdrop for the photo shoot was stitched by my Woolswap partner, Catherine, in New Zealand.

Knit with scraps of organic cotton yarn –Made in America Yarns, the Wildflowers Collection . from Philadelphia

(Modified the front envelope flap- shortened it by half and made a triangle by knitting 2 together on edges while in one row BO 3 then next row CO 3 to create a button hole.)

These were photographed vertically on my phone and I attempted to adjust them on the computer before publishing. And of course they look perfectly aligned and oriented to me but I can’t tell if I’ve gotten them correct for some viewers.  Trying

Interesting Finds at the Handmade Arcade

 

Dear Blog Followers/Readers

Thanks to all who have responded on the positioning of the photos when they view the blog.  It has been beyond annoying and frustrating, especially for those who get the photos sideways. 

Today I spent time rotating and saving and resizing the photos which were shot vertically.  If they are on their side, I hope you will inform me right away so I can go back to the drawing board.  When I look at them they look correct but not for all receiving them.  

I heard from a woman I photographed last week about the auto rotation of photos on various programs.  Here is the link to that information

I knew nothing about Exif Data    

Still working on the solution to proper orientation of photos no matter who views it on ALL devices. 

Now back to our regularly scheduled blog post of the day-   

Handmade Arcade at  Pittsburgh’s David Lawrence Convention Center, Saturday afternoon.

This is Douglas of My Vinyl Resting Place  holding a vinyl record now shaped as a bowl

Deanna of Cleveland Street Glass

When I asked her how she got into this business she said she moved to Cleveland and in just a week her car was broken into.

Mr. Wise co-owner of Second Season packages a pair of Repurposed Redesigned Upcycled mittens made from used sweaters

Peace, Love, Knit- An Early Gift

An early Christmas gift, created by Marlene (my DIL’s mom-we share four grandchildren). This year she and her husband hosted Thanksgiving Weekend in Hardy, Virginia.

Know you’ve seen me on the blog more times this week than the rest of the entire year but I wanted to show you her thoughtful and creative gift. Marlene’s Cricut machine skills are amazing. She purchases and downloads an SVG file from the computer, cuts it out of different colored vinyls, centers it, then uses a special machine to press it on thoroughly. I love how she made the heart a sparkly red.

Marlene knows I enjoy knitting so this design* was perfect.

Thanks Marlene. I can’t wait to wear it.

Photographed by Erika

*About the design- It’s from an Etsy Shop specializing in SVG files- Sammo from Vicksburg, Michigan

Another milestone-2500th post today 

Lots of double zeroes and double letter o on this 2500th blog post. Thanks for looking. 

Potholder loops -in the details

On the loom and off 

Laura’s wreath prompted inquiry- what exactly are potholder loops?

 Take a hot pot lid off without burning your hand. Good deal! Keep cool.


Stretch the cotton loop snd attach to the teeth of the metal loom.Create a pattern or random colored loops.

(you can get wool or nylon loops, too, the nylon material not so effective on hot pots! 


Today Laura made this potholder by carefully planning the order of the loops 

Reminiscent of watermelon by Laurs Use pencils or knitting needles to catch all the loops, remove from the loom and bind off 

Here was Laura’s wreath in case you missed it 

Potholder Loop Wreath 

My daughter Laura sorted the giant bag of colorful potholder loops on the dining room table. I photographed it with the iPhone. 

 We’re in crafty production this week!

Maura brought them with her from Columbus for her visit to Grandma’s house. 


When the potholder is all woven, I slip 4 unsharpened pencils through the loops on all sides.  So much easier to finish up with a crochet hook, a loop at a time. 

 Taking the woven piece off the loom keeps it together instead of it trying to pop off the metal loom as you bind off. 

Pop des Fleurs -Pittsburgh- Guest Blog

My friend Roberta saw this colorful display in front of the Carnegie Library in Oakland and sent me these photos.  I didn’t get to see them in person but I’m pretty sure I saw some blooms being created at the Knit and Crochet Festival.

Pop, is right! Although the real flowers are beginning to come up, this art installation brightens up the city. 

Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh  says, “Pop des Fleurs is an outdoor installation planned for the winters of 2015 and 2016, designed to bring delight and color during the dark season through handmade, pop-up flower gardens”

Thanks for sharing Pop des Fleurs on the blog today.

   

 
   
 

How about the close-up of these gorgeous sunflowers? 

Sock Monkey Brothers

It’s been awhile since I’ve stitched up a sock monkey. The classic.

One for new baby grandson in Ohio and one for a friend of my sister in New York City.  The pairs of socks have been in the house a long time. Once I stitched on the faces, they seem to look at me and smile.

Both Anna and Jack have set up a crew of sock monkeys, told them to smile and photographed them. This evening I placed the newly completed monkeys on the couch in my living room. And took their picture

Very cooperative!

One of the smiles needs a bit of straightening out, I see upon examining the image.  Ooops.

And yes, my sister and I visited the Sock Monkey Museum in Rockford, Illinois when we were visiting relatives.  (The relatives live in Rockford, not the museum)

 

 

sock monkey duoSock monkey duo, going in different directions, more than 500 miles apart.

 

Here are some old sock monkey photos from previous blogs.

When I was a kid (c. 1958)my family lived in the city of Newark NJ. there was a Youth Consultation Service behind our house on Broad Street.  At least a dozen girls lived there and each girl had a handmade sock monkey.  My mom thought sock monkeys weren’t appealing but I always wanted one. Some people think they are ugly, others think they’re cute. These two have a bit of scrap flannel from the sock monkey pillowcases I stitched for the grandchildren for Christmas.  Going with a theme, here. That will be another post.

I don’t think I owned one until I stitched on in 1976.

The first sock monkey I ever made was for my son Mark (39),father to the grandchildren in the photos above. He name it the Doonie Monkey and it was stuffed with old stockings.  I use fiberfill now. And for some unknown reason, I never added a tail on his monkey.  He resides with the grandchildren in Ohio, too.
I’ve make pink and blue and purple monkeys but my favorite is the classic.

If you would like to make a sock monkey, there’s a terrific youtube tutorial by Professor Pincushion on how to make the classic monkey. I don’t add the ears or buttons on mine.