Molasses Swamp Switched for Chocolate Swamp?

I like molasses. Granted it’s been a few years since I’ve played CANDY LAND, but I missed the old Molasses Swamp. You get mired in a Chocolate Swamp these days.  I read it was changed because today’s children don’t know what molasses is!

Molasses makes me think of cookies.  Here’s a recipe (use butter instead of shortening) for Cookies-Molasses Crinkles. My mother baked them for years.

And yes the Candy Land artwork is different on the board. There’s a lot more “stuff” and it looks a bit clown-like now. I miss the ice cream floats. You still advance on the board by drawing a card with a colored square (or two) and moving your gingerbread piece to the matching color.  The plastic gingerbread game pieces look like they are dancing nowadays.  The classic candy Valentine conversation hearts bit the dust, too. 

The board game is 67 years old, says it was created by Eleanor  Abbott, a polio victim herself. Children in the hospital wards, afflicted with the disease, played her original game. Milton Bradley manufactured the first game in 1949 but now the brand is Hasbro. 

My granddaughter Maura brought it to my house while she’s visiting. We played it a lot.

When I played with Anna (almost 13)she had the original version as an anniversary edition in a tin.  

Another opportunity for me to feel antique and reflect how everything changes. Rapidly. 


I went and got out the jar of molasses out of the pantry. An old grandma on the label. Guess it is old fashioned. 

Where did Grandma Nutt come from? 


If you go to the wiki link above you can see the image of the original board. 

Incidental iPhone Shot

After supper, Maura asked to go to the playground. Walking down my driveway, back from playing across the street -I saw the sinking sunlight through this weedy leaf. 

Such bright green. The rays a bonus, shooting into sun. 

The phone so readily available from my pocket. One quick shot. Just like that. 

Capture of the day.  A week of flowers and growing things. Summer at peak!

Cloud Arbor by Ned Kahn

North Side Pittsburgh.  In front of the Children’s Museum. After a fun day at the museum, before we walk to the car, we like to check out the Cloud Arbor. Jack and Maura were enjoying  the cool mist and an unidentified cyclist drove through to cool off. Click to watch  Cloud Arbor by Ned Kahn,  a video of the mist and the cyclist

Laura and Charles head to the wall to sit down Artist Ned Kahn

Waiting for the mist to appear 

Another milestone-2500th post today 

Lots of double zeroes and double letter o on this 2500th blog post. Thanks for looking. 

Potholder loops -in the details

On the loom and off 

Laura’s wreath prompted inquiry- what exactly are potholder loops?

 Take a hot pot lid off without burning your hand. Good deal! Keep cool.


Stretch the cotton loop snd attach to the teeth of the metal loom.Create a pattern or random colored loops.

(you can get wool or nylon loops, too, the nylon material not so effective on hot pots! 


Today Laura made this potholder by carefully planning the order of the loops 

Reminiscent of watermelon by Laurs Use pencils or knitting needles to catch all the loops, remove from the loom and bind off 

Here was Laura’s wreath in case you missed it 

Seven Years Ago I Started the Blog

Achievement7 Year Anniversary Achievement

  1. “Happy Anniversary with WordPress.com!
                 You registered on WordPress.com 7 years ago.
    Thanks for flying with us. Keep up the good blogging.”

Seven years flew by.  Thanks for remembering WordPress.

And thank you to all of you who stop by to look, read, hit the like button and or leave a comment.

IMG_2957My friend Joan’s garden.  Hollyhocks remind me of my Grandmother Hendricks

 

Potholder Loop Wreath 

My daughter Laura sorted the giant bag of colorful potholder loops on the dining room table. I photographed it with the iPhone. 

 We’re in crafty production this week!

Maura brought them with her from Columbus for her visit to Grandma’s house. 


When the potholder is all woven, I slip 4 unsharpened pencils through the loops on all sides.  So much easier to finish up with a crochet hook, a loop at a time. 

 Taking the woven piece off the loom keeps it together instead of it trying to pop off the metal loom as you bind off. 

30 Years Ago the Price was $5.99

Can you guess what it cost to bronze a pair of baby shoes in 2016?*

I’ve seen a lot of bronze baby shoes mounted on a photo stand.  Derek Jeter had a hat bronzed, I read on their site. (Doesn’t have to be baby shoes)

Wednesday night, I was cleaning out a desk drawer and found this envelope and special value certificate to “use by Aug 11, 1986”. Oooops! My money saver certificate has long expired. 



American Bronzing Company is still in business (since 1934) I checked them out and there are a lot of options. Not sure if the ashtray is still available but the company has bronzed over  ” 14,000,000 baby shoes.”

Our story begins in 1934, when Violet Shinbach, the “mother of baby shoe bronzing,” established a business that would soon become the American Bronzing Company, the largest and most-trusted baby shoe bronzing company in the world.

*And today it would cost $79.00 to get a pair of baby shoes bronzed, unmounted. 

I should have ordered in 1986. 

I see you can get silver plate restored too if you have an old tea service that needs spiffing up. 

History of American Bronzing link